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Azure IaaS: Troubelshooting Windows Update error 8024402F

3:31 pm in 8024402F, ARM, ASM, Azure, hybrid cloud, PowerShell, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Update, WSUS by Wim Matthyssen

 
Last week I was troubleshooting a Windows Update issue at several Azure IaaS VMs for a customer. All those Windows Server 2012 R2 servers were workgroup members and had no Network Security Group (NSG) attached which could block the connection to the Microsoft Update servers. But whenever starting Windows Update the below error was shown after a few minutes.

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To get this error fixed I followed the below steps. Be aware that you can retry running Windows Update again after each step because it could be already working again.

 

Step 1

If the server has been configured to use WSUS to get its updates, first wipe out those registry keys by running the below command in a PowerShell window (with admin privileges). Press Y to delete all registry keys when asked:

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This also may reset some Windows Update settings, for instance, the one that decides if updates should install automatically or after asking permission.  Therefore, you need to set your preferred settings afterwards.

Check for updates using Windows Update and see if the issue has been resolved, if not proceed to step 2.

 

Step 2

If you still receive the same error, run the following PowerShell Script to rename the SoftwareDistribution and catroot2 folder. These folders, which are maintained by the WUAgent (Windows Update Agent), are essential components for Windows Update. However, sometimes the content of these folders could prevent Windows Update from applying new updates to the server. When having trouble with Windows Update, it is safe to delete this folder. The server will always re-download all the necessary files, or re-create the folder and re-download all the components, if removed.

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Now please check for updates using Windows Update to see if the issue has been resolved.

 

Step 3

If step 2 also does not fix the problem, you could try running the below command from an elevated PowerShell window. This command will import proxy information used by Internet Explorer in the Windows HTTP Services (WinHTTP). Several server roles, like the Microsoft Windows Update client, rely on WinHTTP to manage all HTTP and HTTPS traffic. Windows Update uses it mainly to scan for available updates.

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Step 4

As a last solution, you could try running the Windows Update Troubleshooter tool. To download and startup this tool run the below PowerShell commands.

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When the tool opens, go through all steps to get Windows Update fixed.

If all goes well, Windows Update should be working again by the use of one of the above steps. Hope it helps and if you have any questions feel free to contact me through my twitter handle.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Microsoft Azure Backup Server: Anti-Virus Exclusions

1:05 pm in Anti-Virus Exclusions, Azure, Azure Backup, Cloud, hybrid cloud, MABS, Microsoft Azure Backup Server by Wim Matthyssen

Running a solid, constantly updated antivirus product on your servers is a necessity to keep a healthy and secure server environment. However, with installing an antivirus product, you also risk having issues with certain workloads and services on those severs. Just like System Center Data Protection Manager (SCDPM), the Microsoft Azure Backup Server (MABS) is compatible with most antivirus software products. Though, the implemented antivirus product can also affect MABS performance and, if not configured properly, can cause data corruption of replicas and recovery points.

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So, to avoid file conflicts and to minimize performance degradation between your MABS server and the antivirus software running on top of it, you should disable real-time monitoring by the antivirus software for all of the following processes and directories, which are listed below.

MABS processes to exclude from antivirus real-time monitoring

For information about configuring real-time monitoring based on process name or folder name, check the documentation of your antivirus vendor.

  • DPMRA.exe (*full path: C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\DPM\bin\DPMRA.exe)
  • csc.exe  (*full path: C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\csc.exe -> you can also exclude csc.exe in all the other Microsoft.NET Framework folders)
  • cbengine.exe (*full path: C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\MARS\Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent\bin\cbengine.exe)

 

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MABS directories in the MABS Program Files folder to exclude from antivirus real-time monitoring

Be aware that when you installed MABS on another drive then “C:”, like in the example below, look under the correct drive for the folders to exclude.

  • C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\DPM\Temp\MTA\*
  • C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\DPM\XSD\*
  • C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\DPM\bin
  • C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\MARS\Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent\bin
  • C:\Program Files\Microsoft Azure Backup\DPM\DPM\Cache (*MABS scratch folder)

 

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Delete infected files on the MABS server

As a final remark, I would also advise to configure to delete infected files by default on the MABS server rather than automatically cleaning or quarantining them. Automatic cleaning and quarantining can result in data corruption because these processes cause the antivirus software to modify files, making changes MABS cannot detect.

 

In summary, there are a lot of antivirus settings you should keep track of when running MABS. I’ve tried to list all of the exclusions, so hopefully it will help you with getting the most out of your MABS setup. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me through my Twitter handle.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Microsoft Azure Backup Server: Error when installing on Windows Server 2016 – The Single Instance Store (SIS) component is not installed

3:36 pm in Azure, Azure Backup, hybrid cloud, MABS, Microsoft Azure Backup, Microsoft Azure Backup Server, PowerShell, Public Cloud, SIS, SIS-Limited, Windows Server 2016, WS2016 by Wim Matthyssen

 
Hi All,

Last week I was contacted by a customer who tried to install Microsoft Azure Backup Server (MABS) on an on-premise Windows Server 2016. However, when he started the installation he always received an error because a prerequisite was not installed, namely the Single Instance Store (SIS) component.

 
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When opening the DpmSetup.log with PowerShell (as Administrator), you could see the following error:

 

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However, when you try to install this missing component through PowerShell it gives you an Error: 0x800f080cFeature name SIS-Limited is unknown.

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The reason for this is that because from Windows Server 2016 the SIS-Limited component is replaced by Microsoft’s deduplication or data footprint reduction (DFR) technology, like you can read in the following article from MVP Greg Schulz: http://storageioblog.com/rip-windows-sis-single-instance-storage-or-at-least-in-server-2016/

Also, when you go to the Microsoft Azure Backup Server download page and you expand System Requirements you can see that Windows Server 2016 at the present time is not listed as a supported Operating System (OS) to deploy MABS, probably because it does not have this SIS component.

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Conclusion

Currently you’re not able to use Windows Server 2016 as OS for you MABS server. Probably in the near future Microsoft will release a new version of MABS which will allow it, but until then you need to stick with Windows Server 2012 (R2) or Windows Server 2008 R2 to install your MABS on.

Hope this helps you with this error.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Microsoft Azure Backup Server: Install a new version of the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent

3:06 pm in Azure, Azure Backup, Cloud, hybrid cloud, Microsoft Azure Backup Server by Wim Matthyssen

Hi all,

Some time ago a client received following alert on his Microsoft Azure Backup Server (MABS):

“Azure Backup raised the following alert for the subscription in use: (ID 33406). A new version of Windows Azure Backup Agent is available. You can review details about the new version and download it from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkId=229525. (ID 100083) More information

Like you all can read this alert was raised because there is a new version of the Azure Backup Agent available. In the Event Viewer on the MABS server you can also find following Warning message under the Application and Services Logs, CloudBackup, Operational:

“A newer version of Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent is required.”

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To install this new agent the following steps were taken:

1) Check the current Azure Backup Agent Version. To do so open the MABS console and click Management. Under Online you can find the Azure Backup agent version. Like you can see in the screenshot below for the moment version 2.0.9032.0 is installed

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2) Download the latest version of the agent via following link: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3162327 . Go to the section Update information were you can find the update package for agent version 2.0.9037.0 In my example I saved it under the Temp folder

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3) Go to the Temp folder and Run the MARSAgentInstaller as administrator

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4) If the UAC screen pops up, click Yes

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5) To continue installing the update, click Next

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6) If all required software is in place, click Upgrade. This will start the upgrade process

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7) When the Upgrade is successful click Finish

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8) If you check the Azure Backup Agent version again, you can see version 2.0.9037.0 is installed

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9) You can also verify the current version by opening Run and typing appwiz.cpl to open Programs and Features. Look for the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent which should have version 2.0.9037.0

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10) Be aware that by default the Warning message will stay there for 30 days. To clear this message after the update you can inactivate it by right clicking the message and selecting Inactivate alert or by rebooting the MABS server several times (3 times at least)

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This concludes this blog post, hope it helps!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Replica DCs on Azure – Removing the Azure Endpoints

10:04 am in Azure, Azure Endpoints, Cloud, DC, hybrid cloud, IaaS, PowerShell, RDP, Replica DC, W2K12R2 by Wim Matthyssen

This blog post is part of the step-by-step to deploy replica DCs on Microsoft Azure which can be found here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/09/28/deploying-replica-dcs-in-windows-azure/

All VMs that you create in Azure can automatically communicate using a private network channel with other VMs in the same cloud service or VNet. However, other resources on the Internet or resources from other VNets require endpoints to handle the inbound network traffic to those VMs. That’s why when you create a new Azure  IaaS v1 VM (Azure Service Manager deployment model), Azure automatically creates two endpoints: Remote Desktop and Windows PowerShell Remoting. Both endpoints consist of a protocol (TCP or UDP) and have a public (for example 54036) and a private (for example 3389) port. The public port is used by the Azure load balancer to listen for incoming traffic to the IaaS VM from the Internet. The private port on the other hand is used by the IaaS VM itself to listen for incoming traffic to an application or service running on the VM.

After the creation of this new VM it’s possible to create additional endpoints if needed. The VM deployment wizard provides pre-defined endpoint configurations not only for Remote Desktop and PowerShell, but also for SSH, FTP, SMTP, DNS, HTTP, POP3, IMAP, LDAP, HTTPS, SMTPS, IMAPS, POP3S, MSSQL and MySQL. If the needed service isn’t in this list,  you can also  also create your own service endpoint and define the protocols and ports needed.

You can manage and isolate the incoming traffic to the public ports of these endpoints by configuring access control list (ACL) rules. By using ACLs, you can for example, only permit access to a specific service from a set of trusted hosts or networks.

However, for security best practices, it’s always advisable when an IaaS VM is configured and a Site-to-site VPN (S2S) exists, to remove all endpoints you don’t need (like RDP) and only to use them when their really needed (for example to access a IIS hosted website from the Internet on port 443). When the S2S is in place, you can connect to the VM through the use of the standard local RDP port (3389) via the secure IPsec VPN tunnel instead of connecting over the public Internet.

In this blog post I will show you how you can delete the RDP and PowerShell endpoint manually by making use of the Azure Classic Portal (AZGR-DC-01) and how to do it with the use of Azure PowerShell (AZGR-DC-02). So, let’s get started.

Manually remove the Azure Endpoints through the Azure Classic Portal

1) Logon to the Azure Classic Portal as a Service administrator or Co-administrator

2) In the navigation pane, click VIRTUAL MACHINES and then click the name of the VM where the endpoint needs to be deleted (AZGR-DC-01)

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3) Select ENDPOINTS

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4) Select the Remote Desktop endpoint and click DELETE

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5) Select YES when asked Are You sure that you want to delete endpoint Remote Desktop? This will start the deletion process

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6) When the Remote Desktop endpoint is successfully deleted, you can test or you’re still able to RDP to the VM over the Internet. First of all, like you can see the CONNECT button is disabled

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7) If we try to connect through the previously downloaded RDP file, no connection is possible

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8) However, when we logon to GR-DC-01 and open mstsc via Run, we are still able to RDP to AZGR-DC-01 like it should, because we connect over the internal network

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9) You can also repeat the above steps, to delete the Remote PowerShell endpoint

 

Remove the Azure Endpoints through the use of Azure PowerShell

1) Open Windows PowerShell ISE, logon with your Azure account and select the correct Azure Subscription

2) Run following Azure PowerShell cmdlet:

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3) Run following cmdlet to check the existing endpoints for the VM

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4) Like you can see only the Remote PowerShell endpoint still exists, which we also can verify in the Azure Classic Portal

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5) To delete the PowerShell endpoint run following cmdlet:

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6) After running this cmdlet no endpoint longer exist for the AZGR-DC-02 VM

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That ends the final part of this series. If had a lot of fun while writing these series and I really hope, it’s useful for some people. If someone has any questions about the series or a specific part of it, you can always contact me through my Twitter handle.

Till next time!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Replica DCs on Azure – Switch DNS servers for the VNet

7:18 am in Azure, Cloud, DC, DNS, hybrid cloud, IaaS, Replica DC, W2K12R2 by Wim Matthyssen

This blog post is part of the step-by-step to deploy replica domain controllers (DCs) on Microsoft Azure which can be found here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/09/28/deploying-replica-dcs-in-windows-azure/

After we successfully installed both IaaS virtual machines (VMs) as DCs there are still some Azure related actions we can perform. One of them is changing the DNS servers used in the VNet (AZU-VNET-01) to primary use the DNS installed on both IaaS DCs. By doing this we will minimize the data (DNS related actions) out of the Azure data center, which will reduce Azure network costs. We can do this changes through use of the Azure Classic Portal or via the network configuration file (NetworkConfig.xml). I will show both steps below, so let’s get started.

By making use of the Azure Classic Portal

1) Logon to the Azure Classic Portal as a Service administrator or Co-administrator

2) In the navigation pane, click Networks and then click the name of your VNet (AZU-VNET-1)

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3) Click Configure

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4) In the dns servers section, delete the on premise DC (GR-DC-01) by clicking the X next to the IP ADDRESS

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5) To add and register both Azure IaaS DNS servers (AZGR-DC-01 and AZGR-DC-02) with the VNet and Azure, just type their name and IP Address in the boxes. I will also add the on premise DNS server (GR-DC-01) as third failback DNS server. When added click Save

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6) When asked click YES, this will start updating the VNet

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7) When finished successfully, click OK

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8) When the DNS list is updated, we must restart all IaaS VMs (AZGR-DC-01 and AZGR-DC-02) connected to the VNet, so they can pick up the new DNS settings

Before the reboot:

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After the reboot:

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9) To check if DNS is working like it should after the changes, ping the on premise DC (GR-DC-01). If all is OK, you should get replies like shown it the below screenshot

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By making use of the network configuration file

1) Logon to the Azure Classic Portal as a Service administrator or Co-administrator

2) In the navigation pane, click Networks, click the name of your VNet (AZU-VNET-1) to select it and at the bottom of the screen click EXPORT

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3) Select your SUBSCRIPTION and click het check mark button

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4) The NetworkConfig.xml file will be downloaded. When finished click View downloads

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5) Click Open folder

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6) Right click the NetworkConfig.xml file and select Edit

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7) You can see in the original file there is just one DNS servers used (GR-DC-01 – 192.168.2.4)

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8) Change the DNS servers like in the screenshot below and save the file

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9) Go back to the Azure portal, click NEW at the bottom, click NETWORK SERVICES, click VIRTUAL NETWORK and then click IMPORT CONFIGURATION

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10) Browse the changed NetworkConfig.xml file and click the arrow

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11) Verify the changes and press the check mark button at the bottom if all is fine

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12) The import will start

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13) When the import is successfully finish press the OK button

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14) Like you can see, the DNS servers (AZGR-DC-01 and AZGR-DC-02) are added

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15) Reboot all IaaS VMs connected to the VNet to adjust their DNS settings

That ends this part of the series. I hope it’s useful, till next time!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Replica DCs on Azure – Transferring FSMO roles to the IaaS DCs

7:27 am in Azure, Cloud, DC, FSMO, hybrid cloud, IaaS, PowerShell, Replica DC, W2K12R2 by Wim Matthyssen

This blog post is part of the step-by-step to deploy replica domain controllers (DCs) on Microsoft Azure which can be found here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/09/28/deploying-replica-dcs-in-windows-azure/

After we successfully installed both IaaS virtual machines (VMs) as DCs and verified everything was running smoothly (time synchronization included) there is still one AD related action we can perform, namely transferring the Flexible Single Master Operation (FSMO) roles between the on premise DC and the ones running on Azure.

Like you probably all know, some of these FSMO roles (5 in total) are rarely used, such as the Schema and Domain naming Master roles, while others are highly used, such as the PDC emulator and Relative ID (RID) Master role. One thing to keep in mind is that each FSMO role only exists once in the domain and forest. When the entire domain is running on Microsoft Azure it’s completely logical that all FSMO roles are ran on a single Azure IaaS DC or split over different Azure IaaS DCs. However, in most production environments a hybrid (combination of on premise and Microsoft Azure resources) cloud scenario is used. In this case you should see Azure as any other secondary site and the placement of the FSMO roles should be treated in that way. Therefore, always assess all pros and cons before moving certain or all FSMO roles to a DC running as an Azure IaaS VM. In either case, I will show you how you can transfer all or some of the FSMO roles to one of the DCs running on Azure. In my examples all these transfers are done by use of the GUI, but you can also use the command-line tool Ntdsutil.

To transfer the FSMO role(s), a user must be a member of the following group(s):

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Transfer the Schema Master role (GUI)

1) Logon to one of the Azure IaaS DCs (AZGR-DC-01), open the Schmmgmt.dll library by opening Run and typing:

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2) Press OK if the installation is succeeded

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3) Also from the Run command open an MMC Console by typing mmc

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4) On the Console menu, press Add/Remove Snap-in, select Active Directory Schema, click Add> and press OK

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5) Right-click the Active Directory Schema icon and press Operation Master…

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6) Click Change

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7) Click Yes

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8) Click OK

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Transfer the Domain Naming Master role (GUI)

1) Logon to one of the Azure IaaS DCs (AZGR-DC-02), open Administrative Tools and click on Active Directory Domains and Trusts

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2) Right-click the Active Directory Domains and Trusts icon and press Operation Masters…

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3) Press the Change button

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4) Press Yes to confirm the change

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5) Press OK

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Transfer the RID Master, PDC Emulator and Infrastructure Master role (GUI)

  • The RID master role and the PDC emulator role should be owned by the same DC as a best practice

1) Logon to one of the DCs running on Azure (AZGR-DC-01 or AZGR-DC-02) trough RDP, open Run and type dsa.msc and press OK

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2) When the Active Directory Users and Computers window is opened right click the domain and click Operations Masters…

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3) In the Operations Masters window, each tab will show you who the current Operations master is for a specific FSMO (RID, PDC and Infrastructure). For example, the RID Operations master is shown in the screenshot below

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4) To transfer the role just press Change…

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5) Select Yes

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6) Press OK

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7) Like you can see the role is transferred to AZGR-DC-02

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8) If you want to transfer another role for example to AZGR-DC-01, select Active Directory Users and Computers and select Change Domain Controller…

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9) Select AZGR-DC-01 out of the list and press OK. This will switch the DC

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10) Now repeat steps 2 till 6 to switch the Infrastructure role to AZGR-DC-01

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Check the location of all FSMO roles (PowerShell)

1) Logon to one of the DCs running on Azure (AZGR-DC-01 or AZGR-DC-02) trough RDP and open PowerShell as an Administrator

2) Run following command (save as .ps1 or run directly)

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That ends the this part of this series. Please continue through the rest of the series to complete the setup (if all are available). Till next time!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Replica DCs on Azure – Manage the Time Configuration settings on the DCs

1:46 pm in Azure, Cloud, DC, hybrid cloud, IaaS, PowerShell, Replica DC, Time Service, W2K12R2 by Wim Matthyssen

This blog post is part of the step-by-step to deploy replica domain controllers (DCs) on Microsoft Azure which can be found here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/09/28/deploying-replica-dcs-in-windows-azure/

Because time management is one of the most critical things to take care of in an AD domain, I will discuss this topic in this part of the series. Like you probably all know, all DCs should be in time synchronization with the DC holding the PDC Emulator role. This DC is responsible for the time in the AD environment. Therefore it’s a best practice to manually set this server to synchronize his time with an external time source on the Internet (time.windows.com, be.pool.ntp.org, us.pool.ntp.org, …). In their place all other DCs sync their time with the this PDC Emulator.

Other than the DCs, all member servers and workstations will sync time with their authenticated DC. Be aware that when the local time of a server or workstation is out of sync (more than 5 minutes – default setting) Kerberos authentication will fail and users won’t be able to login. Besides all that, time stamps are also used in AD replication process. Below I will list some commands you can run in PowerShell, which will manage the time configuration settings on the DCs. Some oh these commands can also be used on a member server or even on a workstation. I hope you have some time to go through it.

 

 

* Picture source: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc773013.aspx

Check and set the Time Zone on a DC (PowerShell):

1) Logon to one of the DCs, open PowerShell and check the Time Zone via following cmdlet:

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2) To set the time zone, run following command:

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Set the DC which holds the PDC Emulator role to synchronize time with an external time server (PowerShell):

1) To find the server who holds the PDC Emulator FSMO role run following PowerShell command:

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2) Logon to the DC holding the PDC Emulator role (GR-DC-01), open PowerShell As an Administrator and run the below command to check the current time against an external time server (time.windows.com):

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3) The following command needs to be run on the PDC Emulator (GR-DC-01). Logon to an Azure DC, open PowerShell as an Administrator and run the below command to set the current time in synchronization with an external time server (time.windows.com):

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4) The following command needs to be run on the Azure IaaS DCs (or all other DCs not holding the PDC Emulator role). Logon to an Azure DC (AZGR-DC-01), open PowerShell as an Administrator and run the below command to set the current time in synchronization with the PDC Emulator (GR-DC-01):

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5) To check if all if the time settings are applied correctly, open up PowerShell (as admin) again and run following command. If you run this on the PDC Emulator and on another DC, you should see different settings under [TimeProviders] if all is configured well:

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This concludes this part of the series, but if you’re interested in reading more about the Windows Time Service you can do so via following Microsoft TechNet article: Windows Time Service Technical Reference

Till next time!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Replica DCs on Azure – Domain Controller Health Check

9:56 am in Azure, Cloud, Command-line, hybrid cloud, IaaS, PowerShell, Replica DC, W2K12R2 by Wim Matthyssen

This blog post is part of the step-by-step to deploy replica domain controllers (DCs) on Microsoft Azure which can be found here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/09/28/deploying-replica-dcs-in-windows-azure/

After we successfully installed and promoted both IaaS virtual machines (VMs) as DCs it’s time to do an overall health check of your hybrid active directory (AD) environment. Below I will show you some tools you can use to perform these checks. Probably it’s not a complete list but it gets you started.

Check Windows Update for the latest updates (GUI)

It’s always advisable when you install new roles on a server to check for new Windows updates after the completion of the installation. To check and install new updates, follow the steps below:

1) To open the Windows Update page, logon to one of the DCs, open Run and type:

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2) Click Check for updates and if updates are available, install all preferred updates

Check the Event Viewer (GUI)

Another important tool to advise when you completed the promotion is to check the system, security, application, and other logs in the Event Viewer. To check these Event Viewer logs, follow the steps below:

1) To open Event Viewer, logon to one of the DCs, open Run and type:

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2) Check the logs for possible warnings or errors

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Run Dcdiag (command-line)

With the Domain Controller Diagnosis (DCDIAG) utility we can analyze the state of all DCs and domain services in the forest and we can create a report to troubleshoot possible problems. To run Dcdiag, follow the steps below:

1) Logon to one of the DCs as a user with Domain Admin privileges, open PowerShell as an Administrator and run following commands:

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2) Open the file C:\Dcdiagresult.txt to view the result and to find possible issues

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Run Repadmin (command-line)

With Repadmin you can diagnose (and in some cases repair) your AD replication status and health. To run Repadmin, follow the steps below:

1) Logon to one of the DCs as a user with Domain Admin privileges, open PowerShell as an Administrator and run following commands:

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2) Open the file C:\Repadminresult.txt to view the result and to find possible replication issues

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Run the Best Practice Analyzer (BPA) tools (GUI)

With the BPA tools we can conduct a scan against the DCs to ensure they are configured based on Microsoft and industry best practices. With BPA we can find incorrect configuration settings and security violations, but also investigate poor performance. To run BPA, follow the steps below:

1) Logon to one of the DCs and open Server Manager from the taskbar

2) Select a server role on the left and scroll down to the BPA section. Click TASKS and select Start BPA Scan

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3) Select all servers you want to scan and click Start Scan

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4) When the scan is completed, you can review all the results and fix possible issues if preferred

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I hope this short DC health checklist helps you in the future and if you have any questions just let me know. Till next time!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Replica DCs on Azure – Promote the Azure IaaS VMs to a domain controller

12:59 pm in Azure, Cloud, DC, hybrid cloud, IaaS, PowerShell by Wim Matthyssen

This blog post is part of the step-by-step to deploy replica DCs on Microsoft Azure which can be found here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/09/28/deploying-replica-dcs-in-windows-azure/

We will start were we left of in the previous blog post http://scug.be/wim/2016/06/06/replica-dcs-on-azure-add-the-active-directory-domain-services-role/ . We have just installed the Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), so now it’s time to promote both servers to a domain controller (DC). We will use both the GUI (AZGR-DC-01) and PowerShell (AZGR-DC-02). So let’s kickoff.

Promote this server to a domain controller (GUI)

1) Logon to the server (AZGR-DC-01) as a domain administrator and open Server Manager. If you start were I left off in the previous blog post, you should see a question mark near the flag. Click on it and click on Promote this server to a domain controller

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2) Select Add a domain controller to an existing domain. Normally the correct Domain is filled in automatically, if this is not the case select the proper domain or enter the domain name in the field provided. Select a user (Enterprise Administrator) who has to rights to add a domain controller to the domain and apply the proper credentials

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3) Select both Domain Name System (DNS) server and Global Catalog (GC). Select the Site (AZU-VNET-1) to which the DC belongs. Fill in the Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM) password and click Next. As a quick comment I just want to remind you that for best practice reasons this password should be documented, as it can help you to gain access to the AD environment in the event that all domain administrator accounts lose access

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4) Since we are not using a parent zone, you will receive below warning message A delegation for this DNS server cannot be created because the authoritative zone cannot be found… We may ignore the warning message, as this will not affect whether the DNS feature gets installed. Click Next

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5) In the Replicate from field select the on premise DC (GR-DC-01) to replicate from and click Next

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6) Select as location for the AD DS database, log files and SYSVOL data the added Azure data disk with drive letter E: and click Next

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7) The following window summaries all selected options. If all is right click Next

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8) If the prerequisites check passes successfully, click Install

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9) Installation will start and once it’s completed, by clicking on the Close button, the server will reboot. If the server is restarted the DC setup is completed

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Promote this server to a domain controller (PowerShell)

1) Logon to the server (AZGR-DC-02) as a domain administrator and open PowerShell as Administrator

2) Run following PowerShell automation script (store with .ps1 extension or copy and run directly) to promote this server to a DC:

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3) When asked enter a username and password (this user should have Enterprise Administrator rights)

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4) Fill in the Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM) password and confirm it a second time

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5) Installation will go on and when succeeded the server will reboot. After the restart the DC installation is completed

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This ends the seventh part of the series. Still a few steps to go, so please continue through the rest of the series to complete the setup. Till next time!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)