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Azure Backup: Create a Recovery Services vault with Azure PowerShell

9:46 am in Azure, Azure Backup, Azure PowerShell, PowerShell, Public Cloud, Recovery Services vault by Wim Matthyssen

A Recovery Services vault is an online storage entity used to backup workloads to the Azure cloud. You can use it to hold backup data for various Azure services such as IaaS VMs (Linux or Windows) and Azure SQL databases, but it can also be used by System Center Data Protection Manager (SCDPM) or Azure Backup Server (MABS v1 and MABS v2) to enable cloud backups.

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These days it is quite easy to create or manage a Recovery Services vault through the Azure portal, but it is even faster when you make use of a scripting language like Azure PowerShell to automate the setup. Therefore, below you can find the PowerShell script I mostly use to do all the work for me. You can just copy and paste or you can download the complete script (.ps1) from the Microsoft TechNet gallery.

To use the script, first adjust all variables to your use. Afterwards login into an Azure PowerShell window as an administrator and when asked login with the credentials for your Azure Subscription.

The script will first create a Resource Group and then the Recovery Services vault in your Azure Subscription. At the end, it will also set the storage redundancy for the newly created vault. Keep in mind that you can only use Locally Redundant Storage (LRS) or Geo Redundant Storage (GRS).

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Useful Azure PowerShell cmdlets for Azure Backup

List all available Azure Backup PowerShell cmdlets

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List all available Recovery Services vaults in your subscription

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Hope this post helps you when you start using Azure Backup.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Azure IaaS: Troubelshooting Windows Update error 8024402F

3:31 pm in 8024402F, ARM, ASM, Azure, hybrid cloud, PowerShell, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Update, WSUS by Wim Matthyssen

 
Last week I was troubleshooting a Windows Update issue at several Azure IaaS VMs for a customer. All those Windows Server 2012 R2 servers were workgroup members and had no Network Security Group (NSG) attached which could block the connection to the Microsoft Update servers. But whenever starting Windows Update the below error was shown after a few minutes.

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To get this error fixed I followed the below steps. Be aware that you can retry running Windows Update again after each step because it could be already working again.

 

Step 1

If the server has been configured to use WSUS to get its updates, first wipe out those registry keys by running the below command in a PowerShell window (with admin privileges). Press Y to delete all registry keys when asked:

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This also may reset some Windows Update settings, for instance, the one that decides if updates should install automatically or after asking permission.  Therefore, you need to set your preferred settings afterwards.

Check for updates using Windows Update and see if the issue has been resolved, if not proceed to step 2.

 

Step 2

If you still receive the same error, run the following PowerShell Script to rename the SoftwareDistribution and catroot2 folder. These folders, which are maintained by the WUAgent (Windows Update Agent), are essential components for Windows Update. However, sometimes the content of these folders could prevent Windows Update from applying new updates to the server. When having trouble with Windows Update, it is safe to delete this folder. The server will always re-download all the necessary files, or re-create the folder and re-download all the components, if removed.

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Now please check for updates using Windows Update to see if the issue has been resolved.

 

Step 3

If step 2 also does not fix the problem, you could try running the below command from an elevated PowerShell window. This command will import proxy information used by Internet Explorer in the Windows HTTP Services (WinHTTP). Several server roles, like the Microsoft Windows Update client, rely on WinHTTP to manage all HTTP and HTTPS traffic. Windows Update uses it mainly to scan for available updates.

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Step 4

As a last solution, you could try running the Windows Update Troubleshooter tool. To download and startup this tool run the below PowerShell commands.

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When the tool opens, go through all steps to get Windows Update fixed.

If all goes well, Windows Update should be working again by the use of one of the above steps. Hope it helps and if you have any questions feel free to contact me through my twitter handle.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)