You are browsing the archive for 2016 December.

2016: My blog year in an overview

2:37 pm in Azure, Azure Backup, Azure RemoteApp, Client Hyper-V, Cloud, DC, Hyper-V, IaaS, PowerShell, Private Cloud, Public Cloud, Replica DC, SCAC 2012 R2, SCVMM 2012 R2, System Center 2016, W2K12R2, Windows 10 by Wim Matthyssen

Hi all,

As a blogger completely focused on Microsoft technologies, it was a fun year of writing about all those interesting and ever changing products and services. As we almost end the year 2016 and are preparing for 2017 to start, I wanted to make a list of all the blog posts I wrote throughout the twelve months of 2016. During the year, I’ve published 26 blog posts mostly about Azure, the System Center Suite and Hyper-V. Below you can find them all divided by technology.

 

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Azure Compute – IaaS (ASM)

Step-by-step: Move an Azure IaaS VM between different Azure Subscriptions

Clean up Azure PowerShell when using different Azure subscriptions

Replica DCs on Azure – Removing the Azure Endpoints

Replica DCs on Azure – Transferring FSMO roles to the IaaS DCs

Replica DCs on Azure – Manage the Time Configuration settings on the DCs

Replica DCs on Azure – Domain Controller Health Check

Replica DCs on Azure – Promote the Azure IaaS VMs to a domain controller

Replica DCs on Azure – Add the Active Directory Domain Services role

Replica DCs on Azure – Adjustment of some server settings before promoting the DCs

Replica DCs on Azure – Initialize and format the additional data disk

Replica DCs on Microsoft Azure – Create the VMs with Azure PowerShell

Step by step: Change the drive letter of the Temporary Storage on an Azure IaaS v1 VM

 

Azure Networking

How to connect an Azure ARM VNet to an ASM VNet using VNet Peering

Replica DCs on Azure – Switch DNS servers for the VNet

Replica DCs on Azure – Create the Active Directory site for the Azure VNet

 

Azure Backup

Microsoft Azure Backup Server: Install a new version of the Microsoft Azure Recovery Services Agent

Microsoft Azure Backup Server: System State backup fails with WSB Event ID: 546

Microsoft Azure Backup Server: System State backup fails with the message replica is inconsistent

Step by step: How to install Microsoft Azure Backup Server (MABS)

 

Azure RemoteApp

An RDP connection to the Azure RemoteApp custom VM fails with the following error: “No Remote Desktop License Servers available”

 

Windows 10

How to deploy Windows 10 from a USB flash drive

 

System Center

System Center 2016 evaluation VHDs download links

Step by step: How to connect SCAC 2012 R2 to SCVMM 2012 R2 and Microsoft Azure

Step by step: Installing SCAC 2012 R2

 

Hyper-V

A list of tools that can be used to do a V2V from VMware to Hyper-V

Client Hyper-V – Using nested virtualization to run Client Hyper-V on a Windows 10 VM

 

Before I wrap up this blog post, I want to thank you all for reading my blog posts in 2016, and I really hope you will keep doing so in 2017. I wish you all a healthy, successful and outstanding New Year! See you all in 2017!

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

How to connect an Azure ARM VNet to an ASM VNet using VNet Peering

4:25 pm in ARM, ASM, Azure, Azure virtual network, Cloud, DC, DNS, VNet peering by Wim Matthyssen

Hi all,

In this blog post I will show you how you can connect an Azure Resource Manager (ARM) virtual network (VNet) to a classic or Azure Service Manager (ASM) VNet using VNet Peering.

VNet Peering, which was made generally available (GA) on September 28th, is a mechanism that allows you to connect two VNets in the same region through the Azure backbone network as they were a single network. This means that you don’t need a VNet gateway anymore, like when you setup a VNet-to-VNet VPN connection. It will allow full connectivity between the entire address space of the peered VNets. So, for example when VNet peering is setup, all virtual machines in the peered VNets will be able to communicate with each other. If you’re interested you can read more about VNet Peering via following link: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-network/virtual-network-peering-overview

Before we start setting things up, first some things to keep in mind:

  • VNet Peering requires that both VNets are located the same Azure region
  • The VNets must be in the same Azure Subscription (only for ARM – ASM VNet Peering)
  • The IP address space of both VNets must not overlap
  • Using your peer’s VNet gateway (UseRemoteGateways and AllowGatewayTransit settings) is not supported when peering with an ASM VNet
  • There is a small charge for data transferred between VNets using VNet Peering (inbound and outbound data transfer $ 0,01 per GB)
  • To be clear, you can find below a drawing of my ARM – ASM VNet Peering setup

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After all this is said and shown, we can start

1) First of all login to the Azure portal and sign in with your Azure account

2) Select Virtual Networks

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3) Select your ARM VNet (in my case AZU-Vnet-ARM)

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4) Click Peerings (like you can see there is one connected device AZU-APP-01)

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5) Click Add

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6) In the Add Peering blade, name your link (in my case LinkToVNetASM). Under Peer details select Classic. Choose the correct Subscription and the ASM Virtual Network you want to peer with. Leave Allow virtual network access Enabled, this will allow communication between the two virtual networks. Then click OK

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7) After clicking OK the peering link will be created

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8) When done, the two virtual networks are peered and you will see the PEERING STATUS between the two virtual networks is in a Connected state

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9) Like you can see, both VMs can ping each other. Don’t forget to allow ping through the Windows Firewall

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10) After adding AZU-DC-01 (10.0.1.36) as DNS server to the AZU-Vnet-ARM VNet, I was able to add AZU-APP-01 to the azuvlab.local domain which was created an AZU-DC-01

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This concludes this blog post. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact me via twitter.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

How to deploy Windows 10 from a USB flash drive

1:21 pm in Microsoft, PowerShell, USB, Windows, Windows 10 by Wim Matthyssen

Hi all,

In this blog post, I will show you how you can create your own bootable USB flash drive for Windows 10 installations. And like you will see, it’s pretty easy these days.

Before we start whit the installation a list of some things to keep in mind:

  • An internet connection is needed to download the tool
  • You will need 8 GB of free disk available on the C: drive
  • The minimum capacity of the USB flash drive needs to be at least 4 GB
  • Be aware that all the files on the USB flash drive will be erased
  • Windows 10 Enterprise isn’t available in the media creation tool
  • A Windows 10 product key (for the Windows 10 Edition that will be installed) is needed when you are installing a clean Windows 10
  • To manually download the MediaCreationTool go to the following website: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10/

After this short list with things to keep in mind, it’s time start. To do so follow the steps described below:

1) First, make sure your USB flash drive is plugged in

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2) Open Windows PowerShell ISE or PowerShell (as administrator) and run the below commands to download the media creation tool to the C:\Temp folder and start it up when downloaded

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3) On the License terms page, select Accept to accept the license terms

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4) On the What do you want to do? page, select Create installation media for another pc and then select Next

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5) Select the proper Windows 10 Edition, Architecture (x86, x64 or both) and Language to install. Click Next

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6) Select USB flash drive on the next page and click Next

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7) Select the correct USB flash drive and click Next

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8) The tool will start Downloading Windows 10

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9) After downloaded the necessary files the tool will start Creating Windows 10 media

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10) When done click Finish. Your USB flash drive is now ready for use

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11) If you select the USB flash drive (E: in my example) you will see all necessary files are in place to start a clean Windows 10 installation

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12) Now that you have created the bootable Windows 10 USB flash drive, you can go to the next step: Installing Windows 10 on a pc (desktop or notebook). To do so, plug in the USB flash drive to the pc and boot from USB. In my example I will use a HP notebook. Startup and when the HP logo is shown press the ESC key to go to the Startup Menu (the sentence Press the ESC key for Startup Menu will appear in the left bottom of your screen)

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13) Press F9 to open the Boot Device Options menu

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14) Select USB Hard Drive 1 – USB DISK 3.0 (in my example this is my USB flash drive)

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15) Select the Windows 10 Setup Architecture (64-bit or 32-bit) and press Enter. This will start the Windows 10 installation. Just go to the complete setup procedure and your pc will be up and running with Windows 10 in no time

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This completes this blog post. Have fun with it and if you have any questions feel free to contact me.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)