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Quick overview of Channel 9 Ignite sessions about Hyper-V and Private Cloud

6:15 pm in Azure, Hyper-V, Microsoft Ignite, Private Cloud, scvmm by Wim Matthyssen

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Hi all,

Like you probably all know Microsoft Ignite 2015 was held in Chicago last week. During this event, Microsoft made several new announcements, such as the Microsoft Azure Stack, Microsoft Operations Management Suite (OMS) and Windows Update for Business. Besides all that, Technical Preview (TP) 2 for both Windows Server 2016 and System Center 2016 were released.

All these great sessions were recorded  and published on Channel 9 where they are ready for download or streaming. But even with all those recordings available, it’s quit hard to find the links to all topics you’re interested in.

That’s why below I summarized most of the sessions concerning Hyper-V and Private Cloud in general. Each link gives you direct access to the Channel 9 page where you can find the video recording and the slide deck.

Code Title
KEY01 Microsoft Ignite Keynote
BRK3461 What’s New in Windows Server Hyper-V
C9-45 Hyper-V Next
BRK3492 Deploying Hyper-V Network Virtualization
BRK3504 Hyper-V Storage Performance with Storage Quality of Service
BRK3506 The Hidden Treasures of Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V?
BRK2463 Hyper-V Network Virtualization: 100+ Customer Service Provider Deployments
BRK3493 Migrating to Microsoft: VMware to Hyper-V and Microsoft Azure
BRK3453 Virtualizing Linux and FreeBSD Workloads on Windows Server Hyper-V
BRK3457 Harden the Fabric: Protecting Tenant Secrets in Hyper-V
BRK2466 Platform Vision & Strategy (2 of 7): Server Virtualization Overview
BRK3575 Veeam Software: Availability Strategies for Microsoft Azure and Hyper-V, A Deep Dive
BRK2473 Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager: Technical Overview and Roadmap
BRK3502 Managing and Securing the Fabric with Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager
BRK3498 Managing Storage with Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager: A Deep Dive
BRK3477 Datacenter Integration Using Automation in Microsoft System Center Orchestrator
BRK1454 Hybrid Partnerships: Enabling On-Premises Scenarios in Microsoft Azure
BRK3904 Exam Prep Session for Exam 70-246 and Exam 70-24: Private Cloud (Part 1)
BRK3903 Exam Prep Session for Exam 70-246 and Exam 70-24: Private Cloud (Part 2)
BRK2493 Microsoft’s New Windows Server Containers
BRK3853 An Insider’s Guide to Desktop Virtualization
BRK3483 Taking advantage of Identity capabilities in the Azure Pack
BRK3466 Extending Virtual Machines in the Windows Azure Pack
BRK2468 NetApp, Inc.: Datacenter Transformation, Head into the Cloud While Keeping Your Feet on the Ground
BRK2469 The Power of the Windows Server Software Defined Datacenter in Action
BRK3337 Sysinternals Primer: Ignite 2015 Edition
BRK3489 Exploring Storage Replica in Windows Server vNext
BRK3474 Enabling Private Cloud Storage Using Servers with Local Disks
BRK3496 Deploying Private Cloud Storage with Dell Servers and Windows Server vNext
BRK3484 Upgrading Your Private Cloud to Windows Server 2012 R2 and Beyond!
BRK3503 Best Practices for Deploying Disaster Recovery Services with Microsoft Azure Site Recovery
BRK2479 Cloud Integrated Backup with Microsoft System Center and Azure Backup
BRK3119 Turning the Infrastructure Inside Out and IT Practices Upside Down: Microsoft IT’s Cloud Adoption
BRK2472 Overview of the Microsoft Cloud Platform System
FND1451 Windows Server & System Center Futures—Bring Azure to your Datacenter (Platform Vision & Strategy)
C9-31 The Microsoft Azure Stack
BRK2461 Nano Server: The Future of Windows Server Starts Now
THR0480 Nano Server
THR0488 Datacenter Management from the Microsoft Point of View
C9-03 Jeff Woolsey on the Microsoft Datacenter Platform vNext
C9-41 Availability on Demand – Site Recovery
C9-40 Availability on Demand – Backup
C9-20 Microsoft’s Storage Strategy & Capabilities in Datacenter vNext
C9-21 Microsoft’s Networking Strategy & Capabilities in vNext
C9-13 Microsoft’s Security and Assurance strategy in vNext

Before I close off, some quick tips.

For those interested in reading all about OMS, just read the quick start guide from my fellow SCUG member and MVP Dieter Wijckmans:
http://scug.be/dieter/2015/05/08/microsoft-operations-management-suite-quickstart-guide/.

People who are interested in downloading all the Ignite sessions (and also from other events like TechEd), I can recommend using the PowerShell script from MVP Michel de Rooij, which you can find over here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Channel9-Session-04b2558b

To end up, I share you the download links for Windows Server 2016 TP 2 and System Center 2012 TP 2:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/evaluate-windows-server-technical-preview

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/evalcenter/evaluate-system-center-technical-preview?WT.mc_id=Blog_SC_Announce_TTD

Have fun watching and I’ll be back soon.

Wim Matthyssen (@wmatthyssen)

Run multiple OSs together with Client Hyper-V and use the hosts Wi-Fi adapter for Internet connection

3:10 pm in Client Hyper-V, PowerShell, Wi-Fi, Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, Windows XP by Wim Matthyssen

Hi all,

This is a follow up and enhancement to my previous blog post “Use Client Hyper-V and a shared Wi-Fi connection to run Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 Technical Preview simultaneous”, which you can find here: http://scug.be/wim/2015/04/20/use-client-hyper-v-and-a-shared-wi-fi-connection-to-run-windows-8-1-and-windows-10-technical-preview-simultaneous-2/

In this previous post, I set up a Windows 10 virtual machine (VM) on my Dell notebook running Windows 8.1 with Client Hyper-V. But why stop with just two Client Operating System (OS) running together? Therefore, I will show you how to automate an environment in which you can run multiple OSs (Windows 8.1, Windows 10 Technical Preview, Windows 7 with SP1 and finally Windows XP with SP3) using your notebooks Wi-Fi adapter to connect them to the Internet. If you’re an IT Pro or a software developer and need to do some testing, this is an easy way to do it.

I’ve you’re reading this I assume that you have already installed Client Hyper-V and added the necessary virtual networks, if not just follow steps 1 to 9 in my previous post.

Before starting some important remarks and tips:

  • Windows XP isn’t compatible with Hyper-V’s synthetic network adapter. As such, we will also need to do add a legacy network adapter for the sharing network.
  • Windows XP is not supported by Hyper-V’s Dynamic Memory feature, so we’ll need to use static memory instead.
  • Only W10 TP has the necessary Integration Services on board, that’s why after the OS installation, we will need to install them to the W7 and XP VM.
  • Before installation of the Integration Services in the Windows XP VM, you need to release the mouse and keyboard focus from the VM Connection window by pressing CTRL + ALT + LEFT ARROW.
  • The computer name of the W7 and XP VM is added when you install the OS. In my example I used W7-TST and XP-TST.
  • As a final remark, if you’ve installed the Windows 7 VM without SP1 you will receive the below error when trying to install the Integration Services.

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1) For the automated built of the 3 VMs run the below PowerShell script. All virtual hardware will be added and configured and the OS ISO’s will be mounted. At the end the VMs will be started up to begin the OS installations. Please be aware that in order to us your shared Wi-Fi connection, the “InternalWifi” virtual switch needs to be attached to a legacy network adapter.

#----------------------------------------

#Author Wim Matthyssen

#Date 06/05/15

#Name BuiltClientOSVMs.ps1

#Usage Built several Client OSs VMs on Client Hyper-V

#Note Change variables were needed to fit your needs

#----------------------------------------

# Variables

$VM1 = "W10-TST" # Name of Windows 10 VM

$VM2 = "W7-TST" # Name of Windows 7 VM

$VM3 = "XP-TST" # Name of Windows XP VM

$VMRAMMIN = 512MB # Minimum RAM assigned to the VM

$VMRAMSTARTUP = 2GB # Startup RAM assigned to the VM

$VMRAMMAX = 4GB # Maximum RAM assigned to the VM

$VHDSIZE = 20GB # Size of fixed VHDX

$VMLOC = "D:\_VM" # Location of the VM and VHDX files

$NetworkSwitch1 = "InternalWifi" # Name of the Network Switch 1

$NetworkSwitch2 = "InternalShare" # Name of the Network Switch 2

$vCPUCOUNT=2 #Number of virtual CPUs

$W10ISO = "D:\Documents\Windows10_TP.iso" # Windows 10 ISO

$W7ISO = "D:\Documents\Windows7_SP1.iso" # Windows 7 with SP1 ISO

$XPISO = "D:\Documents\WindowsXP_SP3.iso" # Windows XP with SP3 ISO


# Create Windows 10 VM - Add Networks - Mount ISO

New-VHD –Path $VMLOC\$VM1\$VM1.vhdx –Fixed –SizeBytes $VHDSIZE

New-VM –Name $VM1 –Path $VMLOC

Add-VMHardDiskDrive -VMName $VM1 -Path $VMLOC\$VM1\$VM1.vhdx

Set-VMMemory $VM1 -DynamicMemoryEnabled $true -MinimumBytes $VMRAMMIN -StartupBytes $VMRAMSTARTUP -MaximumBytes $VMRAMMAX -Priority 80 -Buffer 25

Set-VMProcessor $VM1 –Count $vCPUCOUNT

Get-VMNetworkAdapter $VM1| Connect-VMNetworkAdapter –SwitchName $NetworkSwitch2

Get-VM $VM1 | Add-VMNetworkAdapter -IsLegacy $true -SwitchName $NetworkSwitch1

Set-VMDvdDrive -VMName $VM1 -Path $W10ISO

Start-VM $VM1


# Create Windows 7 VM - Add Networks - Mount ISO

New-VHD –Path $VMLOC\$VM2\$VM2.vhdx –Fixed –SizeBytes $VHDSIZE

New-VM –Name $VM2 –Path $VMLOC

Add-VMHardDiskDrive -VMName $VM2 -Path $VMLOC\$VM2\$VM2.vhdx

Set-VMMemory $VM2 -DynamicMemoryEnabled $true -MinimumBytes $VMRAMMIN -StartupBytes $VMRAMSTARTUP -MaximumBytes $VMRAMMAX -Priority 80 -Buffer 25

Set-VMProcessor $VM2 –Count $vCPUCOUNT

Get-VMNetworkAdapter $VM2| Connect-VMNetworkAdapter –SwitchName $NetworkSwitch2

Get-VM $VM2 | Add-VMNetworkAdapter -IsLegacy $true -SwitchName $NetworkSwitch1

Set-VMDvdDrive -VMName $VM2 -Path $W7ISO

Start-VM $VM2


# Create Windows XP VM - Add Networks - Mount ISO

New-VHD –Path $VMLOC\$VM3\$VM3.vhdx –Fixed –SizeBytes $VHDSIZE

New-VM –Name $VM3 –Path $VMLOC

Add-VMHardDiskDrive -VMName $VM3 -Path $VMLOC\$VM3\$VM3.vhdx

Set-VM -StaticMemory -Name $VM3 -MemoryStartupBytes 2GB

Set-VMProcessor $VM3 –Count $vCPUCOUNT

Remove-VMNetworkAdapter -VMName $VM3

Get-VM $VM3 | Add-VMNetworkAdapter -IsLegacy $true -SwitchName $NetworkSwitch2

Get-VM $VM3 | Add-VMNetworkAdapter -IsLegacy $true -SwitchName $NetworkSwitch1

Set-VMDvdDrive -VMName $VM3 -Path $XPISO

Start-VM $VM3

2) When you’re done installing the guest OSs, logon to your 3 new VMs.

3) Insert the Integration Services Setup disk to the W7 and XP VM.

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4) On both VMs, if the installation doesn’t start automatically, open a command prompt and run d:\support\x86\setup.exe and select “Yes” to start the installation. When the Upgrade Hyper-V Integration Services box appears click “OK”. To complete the installation press “Yes” to reboot.

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5) To check the version of the Integration Services through Device Manager, expand System Devices, right click Microsoft Hyper-V Virtual Machine Bus, and select Properties. Click the Driver tab and the Driver Version line will show you the version you’re running.

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6) To prepare your host to connect to the shared folders and do the rest of the configuration for the W10 VM you can now follow steps 12 to 18 from my previous post.

7) To rename the network adapters for the W7 VM, logon, open a command prompt and run the following commands:

netsh interface set interface name = "Local Area Connection" newname = "WiFi"
netsh interface set interface name = "Local Area Connection 2" newname = "Sharing"

8) Logon to the XP to rename the network adapters. Open a command prompt and run the following commands:

netsh interface set interface name = "Local Area Connection" newname = "Sharing"
netsh interface set interface name = "Local Area Connection 2" newname = "Wifi"

9) On the W7 VM assign the fixed IP Address 33.0.0.3 for the “Sharing” network adapter from the command prompt (requires elevation).

netsh interface ip set address name = "Sharing" static 33.0.0.3 255.255.255.0

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10) On the XP VM assign the fixed IP Address 33.0.0.4 for the “Sharing” network adapter from the command prompt.

netsh interface ip set address name = "Sharing" static 33.0.0.4 255.255.255.0

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11) To share and to create the Temp folder on the W7 VM open a command prompt and run the following commands (requires elevation):

md C:\Temp
net share Temp=C:\Temp /GRANT:Everyone,Full

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12) To share and to create the Temp folder on the XP VM open a command prompt and run the following commands:

net user guest /active:yes
md C:\Temp
net share Temp=C:\Temp /unlimited

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13) To map the Temp folders from the 3 VMs on the host to the X, Y and Z-drive run the following commands in PowerShell (do not run PowerShell as an administrator)

New-PSDrive –Name X –PSProvider FileSystem –Root “\\W7-TST\Temp” –Persist -Credential W7-TST\username
New-PSDrive –Name Y –PSProvider FileSystem –Root “\\W10-TST\Temp” –Persist -Credential W10-TST\username
New-PSDrive –Name Z –PSProvider FileSystem –Root “\\xp-tst\Temp” –Persist -Credential XP-TST\username

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14) As you can see in the below screenshot I’m able to surf with all OSs and share data between them.

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This concludes this blog post. Keep tuned and I’ll be back soon.