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by alkin

Biwug & Scug Session: Using System Center Operations Manager to monitor your SharePoint environment

8:45 pm in Uncategorized by alkin

Title: Using System Center Operations Manager to monitor your SharePoint environment.

System Center Operations Manager 2007 is THE end to end Monitoring Solution. In this session we will discuss what you, as SharePoint guys, find relevant to be monitored.
System Center Operations Manager uses a SharePoint Monitoring toolkit for monitoring the SharePoint Environment. This toolkit consists of a set of System Center Operations Manager 2007 management packs designed to help IT pros monitor their WSS 3.0 and MOSS 2007 and 2007 SP1 environments. These newly released packs were engineered to take advantage of SCOM 2007’s features, including new and improved reporting, additional actions, new views, and integrate IIS and SQL health rollup for a better understanding of the system-level dependencies of the SharePoint environments.
And last but not least: System Center Operations Manager can also emulate end user experience by monitoring a Web Application. We will show you how to monitor a Web Application, even if it is require credentials, and how to record a browser session.

If you have a SharePoint environment and don’t have a monitoring solution at the moment then you just can’t miss this session!

Date: 07/04/09

Time: 18u00

Location: Gertronics, Genevestraat 10, Evere

Speaker: Alexandre Verkinderen

Registration: Biwug Site

More information: Belux Information Worker User Group

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by alkin

Define a Health Criteria for your web application Monitor Part III

9:52 pm in Uncategorized by alkin

W’re almost at the end! :-) Only 3 steps left. First we have to define a healt criteria for our web appliction and after that we can create our distributed appliction that will drive ou service level dashboard.

 

Use the Web Application Editor to choose what conditions will cause an error or warning during a synthetic transaction. For the Service Level Dashboard, an error is equivalent to an availability exception, and a warning is equivalent to a performance exception. Availability exceptions will also affect performance reporting. You can also choose to generate an alert when the status changes. For example, if your transaction includes a request to a specific Web page, you can choose to generate an alert if the page is unavailable. This is done by changing the health status of the transaction when the HTTP status code is 404.

Synthetic transactions are created by recording a Web site or by manually creating requests. For more information about recording a Web site, see How to Capture a Web Application Recording in Operations Manager 2007. For more information about manually creating or editing individual requests, see

How to Create or Edit a Request in Operations Manager 2007.

To set health criteria for a request in a Web monitoring session

1. Open the Authoring pane.

2. Expand Management Pack Templates, and then click Web Application.

3. Select the object you want to edit, and then click Edit Web application settings.

4. In the Request Details pane, you can set criteria to generate an error or warning health state for the request. For example, select the Http Status Code check box, and then select Equals and 404 to change the status when the page is not found.

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5. If you want an alert generated when the health status changes, select the Generate an alert if any error criteria is met or Generate an alert if any warning or error criteria is met check boxes.

6. If you want the transaction to stop when an error or warning criteria is met, select the Stop processing the subsequent requests if any criteria is met check box.

7. Click Verify to test your changes.

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8. After the changes are verified, click Apply, and then close the Web Application Editor.

Important   Repeat this process for every monitor that you create.

 

Next we will create a distributed appliction to drive the service level dashboard.

 

Greetz,

Alexandre Verkinderen

http://scug.be/blogs

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by alkin

Configuring the Service Level Dashboard Part V

9:08 pm in Uncategorized by alkin

After you create your monitors and distributed applications, you must take some additional steps to configure the Service Level Dashboard group and service level goal properties. Discovery finds all the objects that are associated with a distributed application. The current setting of these attributes is displayed in the Service Level Dashboard Attributes view in the Operations Console. This view lists the distributed applications that can be shown on the Service Level Dashboard, their Dashboard group, and their current service level goals.

 

Property

Default

Description

Name

 

The distributed application name

Availability Service Level Threshold

95

The percentage of availability the application must achieve to be shown as in compliance with the availability service level

Performance Service Level Threshold

95

The percentage of performance the application must achieve to be shown as in compliance with the performance service level

Dashboard Group

1

The Dashboard Group setting controls which dashboard the model will display on. All applications are assigned a default setting of 1, which allows multiple dashboards to be created for multiple views of the applications, or for views of different applications.

GUID

 

The GUID of the distributed application

 

Change the Service Level Dashboard Attributes for an Application

To change the Service Level Dashboard attributes, use overrides.

To override Service Level Dashboard attributes for a distributed application

1. Open the Authoring pane.

2. Expand Management Pack Objects, and then click Object Discoveries.

3. In the Look for box, type SLDBase and then click Find Now.

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4. Click Enterprise Service Monitoring Service Level Dashboard Discovery and then, in the Actions pane, click Overrides.

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5. Click Override the Object Discovery and then click For a specific object of type: Service Level Dashboard Application.

6. In the Select Object box, select the distributed application that contains attributes you want to edit, and then click OK.

7. Select the Override check box next to the attribute you want to edit.

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8. Enter the adjusted setting in the Override Setting column.

a. For Dashboard Group, enter an integer or a string.

b. For the Performance and Availability Service Level Thresholds, enter the uptime percentage in a decimal number, without any symbols.

9. Click OK.

 

Now that everything is configured we can start using our service level dashboard!

 

Greetz,

ALexandre Verkinderen

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by alkin

Creating the Distributed Application Models to Drive the Service Level Dashboard Part IV

9:06 pm in Uncategorized by alkin

The distributed application model interface provides a flexible way to customize the Service Level Dashboard display to your needs. The Service Level Dashboard accepts a simple distributed application model as its configuration for application listings and transaction groupings. This model allows you to group Web applications or other monitors on the Service Level Dashboard into applications and regions. You can define how the health rolls up to the component group and the application as a whole by editing the health rollup of the distributed application model.

Important   Note that these distributed application models are in addition to any distributed application models you might have already created for your applications. The Service Level Dashboard works only with a specific style of distributed application model—one that is based on the Service Level Dashboard Application template.

The Service Level Dashboard display shows three levels. The top level lists applications by their distributed application model names, the second level shows the component groups, and the third level lists the actual transaction names. Each level can contain several entries.

 

To create a distributed application model

1. In the Operations Console, click Authoring, right-click Distributed Applications, and then click Create a new distributed application.

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2. In the Name box, type a name for the distributed application, which will appear on the Service Level Dashboard. In the Description box, you can type a description.

3. Under Template, select the Service Level Dashboard Application template.

4. In the Management Pack drop-down box, choose the management pack created in the previous steps from the list of unsealed management packs. (By default, the distributed application you create is saved to the Default Management Pack.) Or, click New to create a new management pack. Click OK.

To design your distributed application model

1. The diagram pane in the distributed application designer displays the component groups of your distributed application. You will see two component groups defined by the template: Component Group 1 and Component Group 2. Right-click each component group to review it. If necessary, edit the object types that are included in your distributed application, and modify the name. On the toolbar, click Add Component to create a new component group. Component groups are generally used to define regions or other groups of transactions on the report.

2. The buttons at the bottom of the Objects pane list all object types that are defined by the template you chose earlier. If your distributed application does not contain one or more of the components shown in the list, click Organize Object Types to view a list of all currently included object types. Clear the check box for any object type that is not part of your distributed application.

3. Click each of the remaining buttons at the bottom of the Objects pane to view the objects that are listed in each. By default, the list contains all the discovered objects on your network that are of that object type.

4. Right-click each object that is a component of your distributed application, point to Add To, and then click the name of the component group to which this object belongs. (These objects may be the Web monitors defined earlier, or other types of objects that you want to display on the Service Level Dashboard at the transaction level. Any item in the component group displays as a transaction, with its health state calculated.) Click Save.

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5. To configure the health rollup of the distributed application (and by extension the Service Level Dashboard), in the Component Group Details pane, click the Configure health rollup link, and create an override for the rollup algorithm for the component group (or entire model) that rolls up in the manner expected.

6. To save the distributed application to a management pack, click Save.

 

After you create your monitors and distributed applications, you must take some additional steps to configure the Service Level Dashboard group and service level goal properties.

Greetz,

Alexandre Verkinderen

http://scug.be/blogs

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by alkin

Service Level Dashboard Part VI

8:19 pm in Uncategorized by alkin

Ok, so we finally have our service level dashboard. Let’s see some reports

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service level dashboard

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Service level dashboard by application:

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Little summary to create a service level dashboard:

  1. Create a web application monitor
  2. ad a recording session to your web application monitor
  3. define a health criteria
  4. Create a distributed appliction
  5. and configure your service level dashboard

 

That’s it. Hope you enjoyed it.

 

Greetz,

Alexandre Verkinderen

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by alkin

Add a recording to an existing Web Application object Part II

11:05 am in Uncategorized by alkin

First you will have to create a web application monitor. See my previous post on how to

create a web application monitor in opsmgr.

 

To add a recording to an existing Web Application object

1. Open the Authoring pane.

2. Expand Management Pack Templates, and then click Web Application.

3. Select the object to which you want to add a recording.

4. In the Actions pane, click Edit Web application settings.

5. Select the request from the list where you want the recording to be inserted. Recordings are inserted after the request you select.

6. In the Actions pane, click Start capture. Internet Explorer will open. If you receive an error message about third-party extensions being disabled, follow these steps:

a. Click Tools, and then click Internet Options.

b. Click the Advanced tab.

c. Under Browsing, select Enable third party browser extensions.

d. Close Internet Explorer, and then click Start capture to open the browser again.

7. In the browser window, follow the actions you want to be monitored. For example, you might click some links or add a product to a shopping cart.

 

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When you have completed the recording, click Stop in the left pane of Internet Explorer. Or, in the Actions pane, under Run Now, you can click Run Test to run the synthetic transaction immediately and see the results.

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Now we have to define our health criteria  and a create the distributed application model to will drive the service level dashboard.

grtz,

Alexandre Verkinderen

http://scug.be/blogs

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by alkin

Create a Web Application Monitor in opsmgr Part I

8:58 am in Uncategorized by alkin

At the moment I’m testing web application monitoring, service level dashboard, etc. So the upcoming posts will handle on how to set up a web application monitoring, how to configure the service level dashboard etc.

The Web Application Monitor provides the synthetic transaction for the Service Level Dashboard. It monitors the Web application and then changes the health state of an object associated with the Web application, based on the results of the synthetic transaction. It is this change in health state that the Service Level Dashboard records and reports on.

petshop

 

To create a new Web Application Monitor

1. In the Operations Console, click the Authoring button.

2. In the Authoring pane, click Management Pack Templates.

3. Under Actions, click Add Monitoring Wizard.

4. In the Add Monitoring Wizard, on the Select Monitoring Type page, click Web Application, and then click Next.

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5. On the General Properties page, do the following:

a. Type the Name for the object, such as Petshop.

b. Optionally, type a Description for the object.

c. From the list, click the management pack created in the previous step or click New to create a management pack. It is recommended to create one management pack per application, and group all transactions for a specific application into this management pack.

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Note   Because the object type will be added to the specified management pack, only unsealed management packs are listed. For more information, see Management Packs in Operations Manager 2007.

 

6. Click Next.

7. On the Enter and Test Web Address page, do the following:

a. Select http:// or https:// from the list.

b. Type the URL for the Web application, such as http://petshop.com.

c. Click Test.

d. When the test succeeds, click Next.

Note   It is possible to proceed through the wizard without this test succeeding. If the test returns an error, check the URL and click Details for more information.

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8. On the Choose Watcher Nodes page:

a. Select the watcher nodes on which you want to run the transaction.

Note   Operations Manager groups the results of the selected watcher nodes into a single monitor. To create separate monitors for different watcher nodes, you must create separate Web Application Monitors, even if they contain the same transaction.

b. Set the Run this query every value to the time that you want—the minimum is 30 seconds.

c. Click Next.

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9. On the Summary page, review the settings. You can select the Configure Advanced Monitoring or Record a browser session check box, and then click Create. If you select this check box, move to step 6 in the following procedure.

Note   Selecting Configure Advanced Monitoring or Record a browser session runs the Web Application Editor. For more information, see Web Application Editor in Operations Manager 2007.

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grtz,

Alexandre Verkinderen

http://scug.be/blogs

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