Lesson learned: Deploying the SCDPM 2012 SP1 agent to Windows 8

January 4, 2013 at 10:46 am in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

Hi All,

I was testing out the Windows 8 Client with SCPDM 2012 SP1 today.  I’ve got a clean Windows 8 machine and I have one of my DPM servers that I was going to use to create some policies for protecting clients.

First thing I did was deploying the agent to the client from the DPM console.

After it gave me a success I created the protection group with some rules in it.

Then I logged into the client to do some testing and I wanted to open the DPM agent on that client.  Here I got a big surprise:

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While I know that you need .NET Framework to use the agent, I thought (and hoped) that it would be activated automatically by the installer.  In Windows 8, .NET 4.5 comes automatically but 3.5 is a feature that needs to be enabled.

So I went to my windows features and enabled the .Net Framework 3.5 feature

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The next screen asked me to download it from the Windows Update service

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But that didn’t work.  I always get this error message stating that Windows can’t download the components.

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After doing some digging, I realized that the client automatically goes to the WSUS server (or in our case the SCCM server) because it was stated so by the administrator.  Since .NET 3.5 is not in that list it can’t download the files.  Luckily I found the solution (although not a pleasant one…) by my good friend Aidan Finn

I placed the windows 8 media and used the following command:

C:\Windows\system32>dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:NetFx3 /All /Source:D:\sources\sxs /LimitAccess

(D:\sources\sxs is the location of my media)

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And now the agent works

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Lesson learned: If you are going to do a mass-deployment of DPM client agents to Windows 8 machines, make sure that you have enabled .NET 3.5 (through your image or through a software distribution solution).  The funny thing is that the DPM backup does work and occurs but the agent UI for the end-user won’t.

Cheers,

Mike