Unable to configure protection with SQL Server 2012

January 19, 2013 at 9:18 am in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

 

While working on some scenario’s to protect SQL Server 2012 SP1 with System Center 2012 Data Protection Manager SP1 I received an error notification in my DPM console

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The error stated that after creating a protection group it was unable to configure protection.

I’ve been looking through various logs until I found the following under the DPM Alerts logs in the Event Viewer of the SCDPM box

DPM could not start a recovery, consistency check, or initial replica creation job for  SRV-SPF-WWR\Belgium on SRV-SPF-WWR.infronteurope.com for following reason:
(ID: 3170)
The DPM job failed for  SRV-SPF-WWR\Belgium on SRV-SPF-WWR.infronteurope.com because the protection agent did not have sysadmin privileges on the SQL Server instance. (ID: 33424)

Now this is something new.

After doing some more investigation, it seems that SQL 2012 is a bit more hardened then the previous versions and the NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM does not have sysadmin rights on a SQL instance.

With this procedure you can change that.

1. Log on to the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio

2. Connect to the correct instance

3. Go to Security > Server Roles, and right-click on sysadmin and choose Properties

4. Press the Add button

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5. Add the NT Authority\System account to the role and press OK

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6. Modify the Protection Group (rerun through the protection group and on the last page of the wizard say Update Group without making any other changes)

Done.

Cheers

Mike

Lesson learned: Deploying the SCDPM 2012 SP1 agent to Windows 8

January 4, 2013 at 10:46 am in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

Hi All,

I was testing out the Windows 8 Client with SCPDM 2012 SP1 today.  I’ve got a clean Windows 8 machine and I have one of my DPM servers that I was going to use to create some policies for protecting clients.

First thing I did was deploying the agent to the client from the DPM console.

After it gave me a success I created the protection group with some rules in it.

Then I logged into the client to do some testing and I wanted to open the DPM agent on that client.  Here I got a big surprise:

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While I know that you need .NET Framework to use the agent, I thought (and hoped) that it would be activated automatically by the installer.  In Windows 8, .NET 4.5 comes automatically but 3.5 is a feature that needs to be enabled.

So I went to my windows features and enabled the .Net Framework 3.5 feature

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The next screen asked me to download it from the Windows Update service

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But that didn’t work.  I always get this error message stating that Windows can’t download the components.

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After doing some digging, I realized that the client automatically goes to the WSUS server (or in our case the SCCM server) because it was stated so by the administrator.  Since .NET 3.5 is not in that list it can’t download the files.  Luckily I found the solution (although not a pleasant one…) by my good friend Aidan Finn

I placed the windows 8 media and used the following command:

C:\Windows\system32>dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:NetFx3 /All /Source:D:\sources\sxs /LimitAccess

(D:\sources\sxs is the location of my media)

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And now the agent works

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Lesson learned: If you are going to do a mass-deployment of DPM client agents to Windows 8 machines, make sure that you have enabled .NET 3.5 (through your image or through a software distribution solution).  The funny thing is that the DPM backup does work and occurs but the agent UI for the end-user won’t.

Cheers,

Mike

We need your help!… on SCDPM tape features

March 1, 2012 at 7:08 pm in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

Although we don’t know the release date yet, we are getting closer to the Release of System Center Data Protection Manager 2012.  And this time, we need your help.  The (former) SCDPM MVP’s are looking for your help.  We need YOU to give us information / requests / whatever… on what the SCDPM product team can do to improve the tape management in SCDPM.  Yes, you read that correctly.  We are going to gather all your feedback and get it to the product team.

You can find more information on http://robertanddpm.blogspot.com/2012/02/tape-management-improvements.html and you can always get the info through this blog.  I will make sure that we get it to the right people.

Thanks for helping!

Cheers,

Mike

Creating a service offering through a self-service portal part 6: Create the offerings

December 31, 2011 at 1:37 pm in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

The series

Recap

In the first post we discussed what we are going to do through these series. I showed the result and the high-level overview of what we are going to do in more detail in the different posts.

In the second post we did some pre-work like creating a management pack specific for this solution and a knowledge base article to give some additional “power” to our solution.

The third post handled the workflow that we needed to build in Orchestrator.

The fourth post handled the preparations in Service Manager such as creating a connector and synchronize it.

In the fifth post we created two types of templates.

In this last post, we are going to create the actual offerings for our HR friends…

Ok… Offerings?

Yeah.  Since we are giving our HR friends some services through a self-service portal, we give them a service offering

To be able to do that, we need to build two “offerings”.  A Service Offering and a Request Offering.  If you are wondering why we need two different offerings, here is the explanation:

A Request Offering is one offer.  It is what we are building here.  A Service Offering could be one Request Offering or multiple offerings together.  So let’s say that we will build more specific request offerings for our HR friends after this one, then we will be able to reuse the Service Offering we are going to build today.

Service Offering

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In the SCSM console, go to Library -> Service Catalog -> Service Offerings. Then, in the task pane click Create Service Offering

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Press Next in the first window of the wizard

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Fill in the Title, Category (this is crucial for where you will see it in the portal), overview, description and as usual, make sure that you select the right management pack. Note that I didn’t fill in the language. If you chose a specific language, then this service offering will only be visible if the internet explorer is actually running in that language (so handle with care here Smile)

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In the detailed information, you can add SLA and Cost information. This is again something you don’t need to fill in but it gives a lot of added value to your solution.  And this is exactly what decision takers (non-technical) want to see.  This proves that your solution covers everything and is not just another technical solution.

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In this window you can add specific services that are related to this offering. Services such as (for example) email that are created in SCSM (maybe through OpsMgr) can be added here.

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In the next screen, you can add knowledge articles to this offering. We didn’t create a knowledge article specifically for the service offering but if you had, you would be able to add it here

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Now we can add a Request Offering to our Service Offering. Because we didn’t create this yet (this will be our next step) we leave this empty for now

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Finally we decide to put this into draft (which then can go through a change process) or just publish it right away with the service offering owner and some notes

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Look at the review to see if you made any mistakes and click Create

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When the offering has been created, press Close. Please note that you won’t see this in the portal until the first request offering has been made

Create Request Offering

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In the SCSM console, go to Library -> Request Offerings

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In the Tasks Pane, press Create Request Offering

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Press Next in the first window of the wizard

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Fill in the Title, choose an image (this is a nice add-on and is a quick-win for IT because of the improvement of visibility), add the description and as always, select the correct management pack.

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On the same window, press the select template and then choose service request (remember the service request we have created earlier!)

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Select the correct service request

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Press Next

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Now we need to fill in the prompts. The prompts are the questions that the user will get and which he needs to fill in (although the prompts can be required, optional or even just “viewable”)

For more information about the different prompt types: http://blogs.technet.com/b/servicemanager/archive/2011/11/08/request-offering-wizard-overview.aspx

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In our case, we need 3 prompts: The user name, the group name and the reason for this. We are going to configure user name and group name with query results (again, for more info, see above link) and reason as a simple text. The end-result should be that the end-user selects the user, then selects the group, fills in a reason (which will be in the service request ticket) and that the username and groupname get passed to orchestrator

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In the next part, we need to configure the prompts. We are going to choose the first one (username) and then select the configure button

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A new window appears, and this will allow us to form a query based on a class.

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For this case, I want to select the Active Directory User class, but it wasn’t visible in the previous screen. The reason is that by default it goes to frequently used classes. I’ve changed that to All basic classes and now I can choose it. Please note also that there is a combined class which makes this even more powerful

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Next step for the query is to configure my criteria. In this case, it is not necessary but you could limit your results here based on many criteria (depending on the class you select)

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Third part is what you want to display. Remember that I had to have the DN name for a user in the Orchestrator workflow. If I wanted to make it myself easy, I could show that here, but then the end-user would get confused. So I decided to display the Display Name only

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Finally I get some Options to chose.

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Because I need to map this to my runbook, I select Add user-selected objects to template object as related items and them choose Add a User to a Group (Runbook Automation Activity) to pass it through to the runbook variables

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Do the same for Group Name but now select on Active Directory Group

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Now that my prompts are configured, I need to map them. Two of them are already done (because I mapped them before to the runbook but the third one (the reason) still needs to be mapped to a field in the request

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Here you can see that I map it on the Service Request and into the notes (as additional information)

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Remember the nice knowledge article we build? Well, here it is, just add it to the request offering

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And finally we can publish it

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Fill in the owner, notes

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Review the summary

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Finished but not just yet Smile.  One more thing to do, and that is add this specific request offering to the service offering we build before…

Add to Service Offering

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In the SCSM console, go to Library -> Service Catalog -> Request offerings.

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Select the correct offering and then in Tasks choose Add to Service Offering

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Select the correct service offering and press OK. You are done Smile

 

And with that, the series come to an end.  Hope you enjoyed it.

Cheers,

Mike

Creating a service offering through a self-service portal part 5: Templates

December 29, 2011 at 7:22 pm in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

The series

Recap

In the first post we discussed what we are going to do through these series. I showed the result and the high-level overview of what we are going to do in more detail in the different posts.

In the second post we did some pre-work like creating a management pack specific for this solution and a knowledge base article to give some additional “power” to our solution.

The third post handled the workflow that we needed to build in Orchestrator.

The fourth post handled the preparations in Service Manager such as creating a connector and synchronize it.

This post will be about creating the templates in Service Manager.

Huh? Templates?

In Service Manager, each time you create an incident or change or problem or… you are using a template.  After the installation, when you have nothing customized, then you use the “default” template.  When you are enjoying the program Winking smile for a longer period, you will create specific templates for specific incidents.  An example.  Imagine that you get a lot of incidents for resetting users passwords.  (Sounds familiar? Smile)  If your service desk needs to fill in the same information again and again (like: which tier needs to handle it, which priority and so on…) they would love a template that already contains that information pre-filled.  So if you build such a template (let’s call it the password-forget-template) then the service desk can choose that specific template each time an incident needs to be logged and automatically most of the information is pre-filled.  That will be a huge time-saver for your service desk.

With a bit of imagination you can build some serious strong templates that save your service desk, yourself and your users a lot of time…

In this post, we are going to build 2 templates.  One template will be a automation activity.  Let me try to explain what that is…  Let’s take a change request as an example.  Most change requests have some activities associated with them.  Activities such as approving (by a CAB for instance) and manual activities are the most known.  Within Service Manager, you can define those activities in your incidents, changes and so on.  We are going to build an automation activity as a template. This means  we can reuse that in other templates (again, incidents, changes, service requests and so on…)  Because it is automated, that means that it will automatically run, with no user interaction and most of the time, it will require some parameters.

The second template is going to be a service request template.  A service request is exactly what the word says… A service request Smile.  This template is the one we are going to use when a user (our HR person) is going to do the request and which we are going to prefill with data.

All right, let’s start building

The automation activity template

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In the SCSM console, go to Library -> Runbooks.

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Select the correct runbook.  In my case, this is Add User to Group (which is the name I gave the runbook in Orchestrator)

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In the Tasks Pane, press Create Runbook Automation Activity Template.

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Fill in the Name, Description and choose the correct Management Pack (! Remember the MP you created before). The Class should be filled in correctly automatically for you (Runbook Automation Activity). Then press OK, where the template form will be automatically opened so that you can change the needed properties

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Fill in the Title, Description, Area and other fields as you wish. Make sure you choose Is Ready for Automation.  If you don’t do this, you can’t use it as an automation afterwards!

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On the next tab, you can create the mappings for the variables that you will need to pass to Orchestrator. Don’t worry about the mappings for now. Press OK to create the template

Create Service Request Template

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In the SCSM console, go to Library –> Templates

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In the Tasks Pane, press Create Template.

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Fill in the Name, Description and choose the correct Management Pack. The Class should be filled in with Service Request. Then press OK, where the template form will be automatically opened so that you can change the needed properties

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Fill in the Title, Description, Urgency and other fields as you wish.

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On the next tab, you can define your activities for this service request. In real-life, you would start with an approval activity but for this demo, we assume that the HR administrator decides anyway so we add immediately the automation activity which we created before this. Press the clip_image001button.

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Select the Runbook Automation Activity that we just created (Add User To Group)

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When you are finished, press OK to create the template

 

That’s it for today.  One more post left and we got our entire offering ready… Stay tuned

Cheers,

Mike

Creating a service offering through a self-service portal part 4: Preparing Work in Service Manager

December 28, 2011 at 3:34 pm in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

The series

Recap

In the first post we discussed what we are going to do through these series. I showed the result and the high-level overview of what we are going to do in more detail in the different posts.

In the second post we did some pre-work like creating a management pack specific for this solution and a knowledge base article to give some additional “power” to our solution.

The third post handled the workflow that we needed to build in Orchestrator.

This post will handle the preparations in Service Manager.  We are going to create a connector to Orchestrator and synchronize it so that Service Manager “knows” the existing runbooks.

Here we go

As said, we are going to create a connector in Service Manager to connect to the Orchestrator installation.

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Go to Administration –> Connectors

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In the Task Pane click on create connector

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In the wizard that appears: In General, fill in the Name and Description. Also, select Enable this connector.  If you don’t to this (now) you can always do it afterwards.  But if the connector is not enabled, we won’t be able to use him afterwards to gather the information for the runbooks.

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In Connection, fill in the server information and add the run as account with access to Orchestrator.

In my case, the server information is: http://srv-scorch01:81/Orchestrator2012/Orchestrator.svc/.  This is the default path to the web service (with srv-scorch01 as the server Smile)

This is how you can build the URL: :/Orchestrator2012/Orchestrator.svc”>http://<computer>:<port>/Orchestrator2012/Orchestrator.svc (please note that this is for RC, if you are still using beta, then you can use :/Orchestrator.svc”>http://<computer>:<port>/Orchestrator.svc)

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In Sync Folder, select the folder that you want to sync. If you choose “\” you will sync all runbooks.  You can select another folder from Orchestrator depending on your needs.

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Finally, in Web Console type in the url of the Orchestrator Web Console (http://<computer>:port where 82 is the default port…)

Press OK to finish the wizard.

Now that this is finished, it is time to use this connector and to synchronize the information from Orchestrator with Service Manager

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Go to Administration –> Connectors.  Select the connection you just have created.

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In the Tasks Pane, press Synchronize Now and then wait until the synchronization is finished.

That’s it…

Note that this connector won’t synchronize itself or on a schedule.  You will need to do the synchronization again when you have changed some workbooks or when you have created new ones and you want to import them. 

That’s it… 2 more posts to go and then we are ready with our solution Smile

Cheers,

Mike

Creating a service offering through a self-service portal part 3: The work in Orchestrator

December 23, 2011 at 9:38 am in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

The series

Recap

In the first post we discussed what we are going to do through these series. I showed the result and the high-level overview of what we are going to do in more detail in the different posts.

In the second post we did some pre-work like creating a management pack specific for this solution and a knowledge base article to give some additional “power” to our solution.

In this post, we are going to focus on the workflow we are going to build in Orchestrator.  Let me already tell you that I didn’t bother to get some checks in the workflow.  In production, we would need to do that, but for this series, and to give a demonstration you want to loose as less time as possible Smile

Let’s start

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Here you see the overview of the runbook.  Small one isn’t it Smile.  To build this, I need Orchestrator 2012 and the Active Directory Integration pack.  That’s it.

You see four activities in this runbook. I left the names of the activities like they are when you drag them into the designer.  Again, in production you want to change those so that the different activities have a name that makes the workflow or runbook better readable.

The first one is Initialize Data.  This activity will get the workflow started.  It is also the activity that is responsible for getting the variables from service manager.  As we have seen in Part 1 of this series, our end-user needed to fill in 3 fields.  Two of those fields deliver us the data (the user and the group) that we need to do the job.

Let’s have a look at the properties of this activity.

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In the Details, I’ve created two variables.  One called GroupName and the Other one called UserName.  They are both of the type String.  That’s it.  Still easy right Winking smile

The second activity is the get user activity.  Because our end-user will select a display name from the portal (e.g. Mike Resseler) we need to find that name in Active Directory and come back with the Distinguished Name of the user (e.g. CN=MikeResseler, OU=Demo,DC=Infront,DC=Eu).  Only when we have the DN of that user, we will be able to perform the last activity, namely add that user to a group.  So let’s see how this works.

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In the properties, all I have selected is my connector to AD.  This is something you need to create before and is normally done after you have imported the AD Integration Pack.  You can select a few Optional Properties here if you want to.  For example, you can choose only to get the DN name (which is what we need…) but because I wanted to play a bit more later on, I choose to return all the properties of the user to the databus.  Again, in a production environment I would do this to get less data on my databus.

Now we need to go to the tab Filter because there is where we are going to create the “Query” to get the properties of the correct user.

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And here we add a query:

Name

Display Name

Relation

Equals

Value

From the pipeline: {UserName from “Initialize Data”}

All this does is search through AD based on the Display Name that equals our variable we got from the portal and that is passed through the “Initialize Data” activity

The next activity is the Get Group activity.  This is comparable with the Get User activity but it has a small difference in the filter

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In the filter, we are going to search for the Common Name (CN) of that group.  The reason for that is that in many cases, a group has no display name, unless you really specified it (each time) into AD.  Many companies don’t do that so that’s why I’m searching for the CN name here

Name

Common Name

Relation

Equals

Value

From the pipeline: {GroupName from “Initialize Data”}

Finally, we have our last activity and that is the Add User To Group activity.  This activity will put the user in the group

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This activity has two input parameters. The DN name of the user and the DN name of the group.  Since we searched them before on our workflow, we have them on our databus

Group Distinguished Name

{Distinguished Name from “Get Group”}

User Distinguished Name

{Distinguished Name from “Get User”}

That’s it.  All you now need to do is find out if your policy works (so test it with the test console our through the web console) and you are done.  Make sure that the policy is checked in and you are one step closer to your solution.

On to the next step which will be the preparation in Service Manager

Cheers,

Mike

Creating a service offering through a self-service portal part 2: Pre-work

December 22, 2011 at 8:19 am in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

The series

In the first post we discussed what we are going to do through these series.  I showed the result and the high-level overview of what we are going to do in more detail in the different posts.

Today we are going to do the pre-work that is necessary to get our solution up and running.  The good news is that you only have to do this once.  Many of you will probably already have done this before but if not, here’s what I did in the environment.

Step 1: Create a management pack

Because I want to be able to export my work, or delete it when I have messed-up Smile I’m going to create a specific management pack for this job.  In fact, when we started discussing this, we wanted to create one management pack that hold all the information for specific HR offerings.  This is out of the scope for the posts, but know that you can use the management pack for other offerings also, prepare it in a lab and export / import it into your production environment… The way it should Smile

In Service Manager

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go to Administration -> Management Packs

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In the Tasks Pane choose Create Management Pack

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In the Create Management Pack window, fill in the required information and press OK

Here you go, part one is done.  You will see in the next posts and all the work that we will do that I stress out a lot of putting it into the right management pack.  Keep that already in mind, because this is something that is forgotten a lot.

The second step we are going to do, and this is an optional step, is prepare a knowledge base article.

While I say that this is an optional step, I strongly believe that this is an added value to your solution.  Don’t forget you are working with end-users here and providing a knowledge base article for them is very important.  It is maybe not important when you present this to technical people (who reads them anyway…) but you would be surprised how many end-users actually read this before calling the service desk.  And even if they don’t do it, then you can agree with the service desk that they direct the end-user to the KB first.  It will save them a lot of work in the long run.

Before I create the knowledge base article, I’m first going to create a separate folder to store the specific HR articles into it.  This is again optional, but in a real-life environment, this will ease the work of those that need to create, adapt or archive the KB’s.

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In service manager, go to Library –> Knowledge

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In the tasks pane, click on Create Folder

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Fill in the required data, and don’t forget to choose the correct management pack.

Finally, you can create a view inside that folder that targets to a specific category (in my example, I’ve created a KB category called Service Catalog)

Then, go back to Library –> Knowledge

and in the tasks pane, click on Create Knowledge Article

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In the Knowledge Article window, fill in a Title, Description, add some keywords (separated by a semi-column), the owner of the article and so on

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In the next tab (Analyst) you can enter the “manual” for the job

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In the end choose Published to make the knowledge base available for further use (top left)

That’s it for now.  You have done some pre-work and you are ready to start with the next steps.  Important to remember is the management pack that you create once and the added value a knowledge base article will be for your end-users.  Oh yeah, if your KB article isn’t completely nice from the start, don’t worry about it.  You can always revision those afterwards.  The largest companies in the world do it the same way Smile

Cheers,

Mike

Creating a service offering through a self-service portal part 1: Introduction

December 21, 2011 at 7:35 pm in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

Introduction

A few days ago, I was having a chat with my friend Alexandre Verkinderen (@AlexVerkinderen) about the private cloud.  One of the key points of the private cloud is offerings through a self-service portal.  As usual, because we are all technical people, we immediately started to talk about provisioning Virtual Machines.  However, at a certain moment I wanted to discuss other offerings.  While provisioning virtual machines is a pretty cool thing to demo, I wanted to demo something else that proves the value to business people.  At that moment, we came to HR.  Because both Alex and me believe that many of the requests that HR does to IT can be automated, we thought to start there.  In this series I want to demonstrate (with a very simple example) how easy it is to create such an offering with system center 2012 and how easy it is to convince your management with a simple example.

The example

In every company I worked, I saw a ton of requests at the service desk for adding a user to a group.  How cool would it be to offer that through a self-service portal and then automatically execute it without the need of a service desk or IT-guy and still keep a track record of it.  No 20 emails anymore for asking for approval, no “lost” jobs or delays.  In our example, HR is the decision maker and requests it through the portal and a couple of minutes later, it is done.  We are also building other specific offerings such as create a user, update a users data (such as home address, phone number, title etc.…) but for this series, we will use this specific example.

The series

In this series we will start from nothing besides the base infrastructure.  We do already have a domain controller, a service manager server (with the portal installed) and an orchestrator (and a SQL of course to host our databases).  We also have created the connection in Orchestrator to AD. So our base infrastructure is up and running, and now we need to get started.

This first post is the introduction.  I’ll walk you through the high-level steps.  Explain what we exactly are going to do and what the end result will be.  After that, in the next couple of days, the following posts will follow:

The end-result

Of course you want to know how this is going to look… Well, here goes, this is what the end-user will see (and that is (after all) the most important thing)

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This is your Service Portal.  You have a few categories (things we build before and things that are imported through management packs) but we are going to focus on the Human Resources and then Human Resources again Smile part of the portal

When we click on the Human Resources part, we go to the next screen

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Here you can see that we have created 1 offering.  This offering is to add a user to a group.  That’s it, nothing more, nothing less, but again, if you ask inside your service desk for a report on how many time gets wasted with these requests…. When we click on that offering (ad user to a group) we get the next screen

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Because we want to make it complete, and because we are working with end-users here, we want to make it complete.  This means a KB article as well, and some icons on it as you can see in the screenshot.  Now we click on the Go to Request button and we can start filling in the request

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In this request (as we will see throughout the series we want the end-user to give us 3 answers:

  • Which user
  • Which group
  • The Reason

Which user and which group is important to automate this and the reason is to keep a track record of why this user has been added to the specific group.

In the first screenshot, you see that the end-user can pick a user out of a grid and can also use a search to find that specific user.

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In this screenshot, you see that the user can select the group from another grid that contains only groups (please note that this is all on the same page and that he needs to scroll)

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Finally the end-user types in the reason and then presses the Next button

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He can now review the request, and when everything is ok, he can press the Submit button

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Done.

Now I know I could extend this demo by adding notifications and stuff but there is some really good information on Technet on that subject already.  So if you want to do that, have a look here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh519719.aspx

Finally, I wanted to have a track record to view in Service Manager

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And that’s it.  It is simple, understandable and doesn’t require a lot effort from the HR person.  And more importantly, it is done after a few minutes and IT didn’t do anything Smile

Oh yeah, for those who are wondering… Yes it is perfectly possible to make sure that HR can’t add users to schema admins or domain admins or whatever…

The High-level steps

Now how are we going to build this technically:

First we are going to do some pre-work.  We are going to create a management pack where we will store all our work in.  We are also going to write our knowledge base article already in front.  This is optional, but like I said, it adds an additional “plus” to your solution.  (Not to mention in real-life, less calls to your service desk if the article is well written)

Second, we are going to build an Orchestrator Runbook.

After that we are going to create a connector from Service Manager to Orchestrator and synchronize it to get the runbooks into service manager.

From that runbook that has been imported, we are going to create an automation template.  This is an activity that we can use in change requests and service requests.

Again, we are going to create a template, but this time a service request template and add the automation template in it.   This way, we will have a template with pre-filled in fields that contains the steps that need to be done to get the job done.

Finally, we are going to create a service offering (the HR part in the portal) and a Request offering (add a user to a group) and add that last request offering (or better connect it) to the service offering. 

Still with me?  It will all become clear in the next posts Smile

Stay tuned

Cheers,

Mike

TechDays 2012: 80% of agenda online and 1 more week to benefit from 15% discount

December 13, 2011 at 5:28 pm in Uncategorized by mikeresseler

Hey All,

The next blog post comes from Microsoft itself, but if you are a Belgian ITPro or Developer, it’s worth reading… Last week to get a discount for the techdays Belgium and I promise it will be a great edition with content you can’t miss…

For those who are preparing the private cloud… Watch out for the great deep-dive day with nobody less then Dr. Tom Shinder (twitter: @tshinder).  I have the honor and pleasure to present a part of this day with a guy that lives, eats and breaths the Private Cloud…

Cheers,

Mike

Just 1 more week to benefit from a 15% discount on your ticket for TechDays 2012: the Early Bird pricing ends on December 21. Registrations are coming in strong, so be sure to secure your spot before we sell out!


Top Speakers




Developer Track
Alex Turner

Brian Keller

Jeff Prosise
IT Pro Track
Corey Hynes

John Craddock

Adam Hall

We are happy to confirm speakers like:

- In the Developer track: Alex Turner, Brian Keller, Bart De Smet, Gill Cleeren, Jeff Prosise, Maarten Balliauw, Matt Milner, Ben Riga, Steve Sanderson, Nikhil Kothari, Rob Miles, Tarek Madkour, Wade Wegner

- In the IT Pro track: John Craddock, Kurt Roggen, Ilse Van Criekinge, Adam Hall, Corey Hynes, Kim Oppalfens, Mike Resseler, Dan Holme 

International speakers are teamed up with our local experts to give you a top content mix.

TechDays program: 80% of agenda is finalized

This year promises to bring a lot of new content from Microsoft. Looking at the next versions of tooling, languages, OS and management you know this is not a standard TechDays event. Our content is split into current and upcoming technology.

Deep Dives (February 16)

Peter Himschoot and Jurgen Postelmans (U2U) will be delivering a full day .NET 4.5 and Visual Studio (Dev11) Futures for Web Development Deep Dive covering all the latest and greatest in .NET 4.5, focusing on Web Development with ASP.NET, HTML5 and WCF.

Rhonda Layfield will be delivering a full day deep dive covering all the different tools and techniques to deploy Windows 7, she will also cover the upcoming Windows OS deployment tools.

Mike Resseler & Tom Shinder will deliver a full day covering private cloud topics, including Management and Operations of your private cloud infrastructure.

About TechDays 2012

Join our 10th anniversary edition in a new location (Kinepolis Imagibraine – Braine l’Alleud) and learn about:
• Windows & Internet Explorer
• Windows Server 8 & Hyper-V
• Windows Phone 7 development
• System Center 2012 & Windows Intune
• Tooling and languages with Visual Studio, C# and VB Futures
• Next generation apps
• Cloud development with Windows Azure Platform
• Web development with HTML5, JavaScript and ASP.NET
• …

> REGISTER NOW

Hope to see you at the TechDays 2012!

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