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Configuration Manager 2012 OSD : Only import the Intel chipset drivers you really need for your brand/model !

6:31 pm in ConfigMgr 2007 R2, ConfigMgr 2012, configmgr 2012 R2, ConfigMgr 2012 SP1, ConfigMgr SP2, configmgr2007, Deployment, Drivers, Operating System Deployment, OSD, sccm, SCCM 2007, SCCM 2007 R2, SCCM 2007 R3, SCCM 2007 SP2, SCCM 2012, sccm 2012 R2, SCCM 2012 R2, SCCM 2012 SP1, sccm RTM, sccm2007 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

 

Yesterday I wrote a blogpost about the reason to keep your “Driver DB” and “driver packages” as clean as possible and that you do not need to import all the junk they provide in those so called “enterprise driver packages” for multiple models.

As a first tip for helping you accomplish that , we show you in this blog post how we can limit the number of *.inf files we need to import from Intel(R) Chipset Device Software . When downloading and extracting that Intel(R) Chipset Device Software package you will see that originally there are about  98 inf files present :

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Now reduce the number of INF files :

Two override command switches for setup.exe from Intel(R) Chipset Device Software that will help us to reduce the *.inf files we need to import into our “Driver Package” :

-AONLY Extracts the needed INF files to install on the current system. If the install has been run once successfully, ‘-AONLY’ will not return any INFs when used in conjunction with ‘-OVERALL’ switch, all the needed INFs for the system will be extracted.

-P <Installation Path> Specifies the hard disk location to which the INF program files are copied. If this flag is not specified at the command line, the <Installation Path> directory is as follows: C:\Program Files\Intel\INFInst .

If this flag is used without the ‘-A’ option, only the Readme will be copied to <Installation Path>. The directory name can include spaces, but then a pair of double quotes (") must enclose the directory name. There should not be any space between the switch ‘-p’ and the directory name. This flag works in either Silent Mode or Interactive Mode.

Lets execute on the local brand/model that contains an intel chipset :

The result of running the setup with those parameters:

And then the result after running the tool on your local brand/model , you will see that the number of *.inf files are reduced to five (5) items ! isn’t that great ? Now copy those drivers to your regular driver import process and you reduced the number of bloat in your ConfigMgr driver database by 80% at least !

 

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Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

MVP enterprise Client Management

Lenovo X1 not PXE booting in Configmgr 2012 SP1 ?

10:51 am in ConfigMgr 2012, ConfigMgr 2012 SP1, Deployment, lenovo, Operating System Deployment, OSD, SCCM 2012, SCCM 2012 SP1, windows 8 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

 

Customer does zero-touch Windows 8 deployments on all computers , but when I tried it on the Lenovo Carbon X1 with the USB Ethernet dongle (P/N: 0A36322 or 0B67708) that Lenovo sells , it didn’t work.

However PXE boot works and I get an IP to begin the WinPE x64 download but once we get in the WinPE 4.0 stack , the Ethernet lights turns off and the machine reboots.To troubleshoot, I pressed F8 to bring up the CMD and IPCONFIG /all doesn’t list the NIC. Strange .

What if PXE boot does not work at all ? You need to do this first :

  • In the BIOS, under STARTUP, change the UEFI/Legacy Boot to "Legacy Only"
  • In the BIOS, under RESTART, change the OS Optimized Defaults to "Disabled", then choose "Load Setup Defaults".

On Configmgr 2012 sp1 ,  I imported the x64 drivers both from Lenovo the Ethernet dongle and then redeployed the boot images but no luck each time.

So hold on a minute .. does that X1 only have USB 3 ports ? Yes it has .

Solution : Download the USB 3.0 Driver: Intel® USB 3.0 eXtensible Host Controller Driver for Intel® 7 Series/C216 Chipset Family here : https://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?DwnldID=21129 . Make sure you have version 1.0.8.251 as older versions do not work with WINPE 4.0 .

Import the drivers in ConfigMgr 2012 SP1 and add them to your boot image . Now it will work !

Note : Other systems that exhibit this same behavior are the ASUS Zenbook UX31, Apple MacBook Air plus and I expect most of the new Ultrabook form factor systems that only have USB 3.0 ports and no built-in ethernet port will have this same problem.

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

Enterprise Client Management MVP

Do you need driver packs for deploying Fujitsu Systems ?

12:10 pm in Fujitsu, Operating System Deployment, OSD by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

 

I’ve also found that Fujitsu also provided a SCCM driver cab download for their enterprise models. Get the supported model list and driver link here :

http://support.ts.fujitsu.com/content/sccm.asp?LNG=EN&LNID=1

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Hope it helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

How to create an application for deploying the App-V 5.0 Client with Configmgr 2012

9:09 pm in App-V, App-V 5.0, Application Model, AppV, CM12, ConfigMgr 2012 SP1, Deployment, deployment types, detection methods, Operating System Deployment, OSD, sccm, SCCM 2012 SP1, vbscript by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

 

In this blog post we will show you how to create the application for deploying the App-V 5.0 client which is part of the MDOP ( Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack )suite.

App-V 5.0 client is supported on the following platforms (As you can see , there is NO XP support) :

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First we need to have a look on the exact prerequisites needed to run the App-V 5.0 client . You will find that kind of information here : http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj713458.aspx

However the information on what version you need on the Microsoft Visual C++ is vague. We will clarify that below :

  1. Microsoft Windows .NET Framework 4 (Full Package) (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=17718)
  2. Windows PowerShell 3.0 (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=34595)
  3. Download and install KB2533623 (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=26746)
  4. The Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 SP1 x64 Redistributable –> v10.0.40219 (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=268896)

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  1. The Microsoft Visual C++ 2005 SP1 x86 Redistributable –> v8.0.61001 http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=26347

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Now we need to create for each component an application . Lets start :

Windows .NET Framework 4 (Full Package)

Knipsel

Knipsel2

Knipsel3

Full installation code : dotNetFx40_Full_x86_x64.exe /q /norestart /ChainingPackage ADMINDEPLOYMENT

Knipsel4

Create 2 detection methods as shown below

Knipsel5

Detection Method 1 : {8E34682C-8118-31F1-BC4C-98CD9675E1C2}

Knipsel6

Detection Method 2 : {F5B09CFD-F0B2-36AF-8DF4-1DF6B63FC7B4}

Windows PowerShell 3.0

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Full installation code : c:\windows\System32\wusa.exe "Windows6.1-KB2506143-x64.msu" /quiet /norestart

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Use a script as detection method :

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Full detection script :

KB2533623 –> Apply hotfix in your base image or use CBS updates with offline updates

Microsoft Visual C++ 2010 SP1 –> Use download link specified above and use MSI detection methods

Microsoft Visual C++ 2005 SP1 –> Use download link specified above and use MSI detection methods

App-V 5.0 Client itself

When done , we going to create the App-V 5.0 Client Application . Deploy one of the following Windows Installer files to the target computer. The Windows Installer file you specify must match the configuration of the target computer.

  • If the target computer is running a 32-bit Microsoft Windows operating system, deploy the appv_client_MSI_x86.msi.
  • If the target computer is running a 64-bit Microsoft Windows operating system, deploy the appv_client_MSI_x64.msi.
  • If you are deploying the App-V 5.0 Remote Desktop Services client, deploy the appv_client_rds_MSI_x64.msi.

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Create your application.

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Create 2 deployment types : x64 and x86

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For the X64 deployment type

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Use the regular msi install parameters

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Use the regular msi detection method

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Now you must create dependencies . Make sure you select AUTO Install !

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First create the Visual C++ 2005 SP1 x86 and select the deployment type you created earlier .

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Then create a WMF 3.0 one and select the deployment type you created earlier .

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Then create the Visual C++ 2010 SP1 x86 and select the deployment type you created earlier .

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Then as the last one , create the Visual C++ 2010 SP1 x64 and select the deployment type you created earlier .

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Your al set , your App-V 5.0 install is ready to be used .

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

Configmgr SP1 : Windows 7 deployment is not supported anymore from the setup.exe

8:10 pm in CM12, ConfigMgr 2012, ConfigMgr 2012 SP1, Operating System Deployment, OSD, SCCM 2012, SCCM 2012 SP1, System Center by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

 

Windows 7 Setup.exe install is not supported ( but also VISTA , Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2 )on ConfigMgr 2012 SP1.  With SP1, you need to use a WIM installation unless you’re installing Windows 8.  It was mentioned here :

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj591552.aspx#BKMK_WhatsNewSP1_Software

The build and capture task sequence was updated to apply an operating system image instead of running Setup.exe for installation. You can still run Setup.exe for Windows 8 deployments by editing the task sequence in the task sequence editor.

If you want to use the Windows 7 install.wim, find some instructions here to make sure the OS ends up on drive C:

When doing build and capture for Windows 7, you will need to first import the Windows 7 install.wim, which can be found in the sources folder on the Windows 7 installation media.

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Once you have imported the install.wim as an available Operating System Image package, then you can update the build and capture task sequence to use the image instead of Setup (in my screenshot, I’m using the Windows 8 install.wim, but Windows 7 works the same way).

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Now with Windows 7, there are some additional considerations required to ensure the installed/captured image ends up on drive C: (because the Windows 7 install.wim was captured using drive D: originally).  You must add a Set Task Sequence Variable step before the Apply Operating System step that sets OSDPreserveDriveLetter=False.

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Finally, you need to make sure that any partitions that come before the Windows partition are configured to not assign a drive letter.

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This will ensure the Windows partition is assigned the first drive letter (C:) when the OS is booted.  Once the image has been captured, it will already have the Windows partition captured as drive C:, so none of these additional steps are needed when actually deploying the image.

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

ConfigMgr 2012 SP1 Beta : Skipping Client prerequisites in the OSD “Setup windows and install Configmgr client” step.

6:22 pm in CM12, ConfigMgr 2012, ConfigMgr 2012 SP1, Operating System Deployment, OSD, SCCM 2012, SCCM 2012 SP1, System Center, WES, WES 2009, WES2009 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

 

Hi guys ,

Working for a customer on managing WES 2009 Clients with Configmgr 2012 sp1 in TAP. On of the requirements by the customer was not to install Silverlight 5.0 or .net 4.0 onto the WES2009 Device as they did not manage or support their core image.

The client prerequisites documentation can be found here on technet http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg682042.aspx .

Silverlight is not required, Software Center and Software Catalog are the only things that need it.  You can specify a commandline switch on ccmsetup to not install Silverlight.  Example: CCMSetup.exe /skipprereq: silverlight.exe but that only works to client push or manual install in RTM

If my base image has .net 2.x installed and I don’t want install .net 3.0/3.5/4.0 because of lack of disk space – (image being build by another company and no possibility to adjust ) and app compatibility on the embedded, how can I use the */skipprereq* on the OSD “Setup windows and install Configmgr client” step ?

GOOD NEWS ! They fixed that in SP1 . Now you are able to pass that “/SKIPPREREQ” parameter in your  OSD “Setup windows and install Configmgr client” step .

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

Installing Intel HD Graphics Driver for WinXP with SCCM 2007 SP2 fails with error code 14

11:26 am in ConfigMgr, ConfigMgr 2007, ConfigMgr 2007 R2, ConfigMgr SP2, ConfigMgr2007 R3, Intel, Operating System Deployment, OSD, SCCM 2007, SCCM 2007 R2, SCCM 2007 R3, SCCM 2007 SP2 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

If you need to install the latest release of the Intel HD Graphics Driver via a SD package or OSD task sequence with SCCM 2007 SP2.

I downloaded the driver from the Intel website and built a package for a silent install (just adding -s to setup.exe) .

If I run it manually, it works fine. If I have it run by a SCCM SD program or OSD task Sequence , it runs fine, but the SCCM program log reports error 14.

The IntelGFX log shows no error, the drivers installs fine… why does SCCM say it didn’t ? SCCM reports that error code (14) is related to the product.

 

Workaround :

Make a .cmd that installs it, and add echo finish at the end so that the .cmd file is sending return code 0(Zero) to SCCM.

 

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntnx

Opalis 6.3 : Building a VMware/SCCM Opalis provisioning workflow

7:54 pm in ConfigMgr, ConfigMgr 2007, ConfigMgr 2007 R2, ConfigMgr SP2, configmgr2007, ConfigMgr2007 R3, Deployment, Installation, Opalis, Opalis 6.3, Operating System Deployment, powershell, sccm, SCCM 2007, SCCM 2007 R2, SCCM 2007 R3, SCCM 2007 SP2, sccm2007, Virtual machine, Vmware by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

Recently we did a customer private cloud project where we used all the system center tooling ( http://www.microsoft.com/systemcenter/en/us/default.aspx) , except for the hypervisor layer , which was VMware .

One of the scenarios that the customer had in mind , was to provision all there virtual servers with SCCM and we had to use Opalis to become the glue between VMware – BMC Remedy and System Center. In the first step of the project we didn’t use the Change request mechanism from BMC Remedy yet. Special thanks to my colleague Gunther Dewit for helping me out on this one .

**** Disclaimer **** – This is a very basic workflow – we will post improvements as we go along – it is for helping people moving forward **** Disclaimer ****

The workflow itself

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Delivering input

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The first step in creating a workflow is doing a custom start where we could input some necessary variables . The Custom Start Activity is used to create a generic starting point for Workflows. By adding parameters to the Custom Start Activity it can consume external data which can be passed to downstream Workflow Activities.

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These are the parameters the workflow needs in further steps.  All the rest of the information that is residing in the data bus of Opalis  .

This input is required, without it, the workflow won’t start. A popup will be presented when starting the workflow.

Now that we have all the necessary input required, we can continue with the creation of the virtual machine. In order to create a virtual machine, we need to provide some parameters, some of them will come from the Custom start step, others will have to be adapted per workflow.

 

Creating the virtual machine

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These are the required parameters.

  • Name: This is the name that will be given to the virtual machine, we will get it from the Custom Start  where we filled in a name.
  • Datastore: This is the datastore that will host the virtual machine disk, we will get it from the Custom Start  where we filled in the datastore.
  • DiskMB: Since it was decided to have a fixed disk with a size of 100GB, we filled it in directly instead of asking it in the first step.
  • DiskStorageFormat: This is the thick or thin format, thin was decided as the default format.
  • MemoryMB: This is the amount of memory that will be given to the virtual machine, we will get it from the Custom Start where we filled in an amount of memory.
  • NumCPU: This is the number of CPU’s that will be given to the virtual machine, we will get it from the Custom Start where we filled in the number of CPU’s we need.
  • CD: It was decided that all VM’s will have a cd drive so we set this to true.
  • VMSwapFilePolicy: This will set the swapfile policy the states where the swapfile will be saved, it was decided to do this in the VM itself.
  • VMHost: This is the physical host where the VM will be hosted, this integration pack cannot provision on cluster yet so you need to choose a physical host.
  • GuestID: This is the OS version that will be installed on the VM.
  • Folder: This is the foldername where the VM will be installed as shown in the ESX console.

You can add more details trough the “optional properties” button. If all goes well, the workflow has created the virtual machine now.

Now we need to change some things on the virtual machine.

 

Getting the network adapter settings from the created virtual machine

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First we need to change the network settings. The VM name, we get from the Custom Start , since this is a read action, no further settings are needed.

Alternatively, you can specify some filters to narrow the data that you receive back.

Alternatively, you can specify some filters to narrow the data that you receive back.

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Now we will delete all the network connection that VMware made by default because they are useless to us.

 

Removing the network adapters from the virtual machine

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The Network Adapter name is data that we got back from the read action above and the VM name is still the name entered at the Custom Start .

This will remove all network adapters from the VM, alternatively, you can specify filters if you only want to delete a specific adapter.

 

Adding the production network adapter to the virtual machine

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Now we need to add a network adapter to the VM. The VM name is still the name we entered at the Custom Start .

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The NetworkName is the name of the network that you want your network adapter connecting to.

The StartConnected specifies if it will be connected to the network or only added without being connected.

The Type is e1000 as this is the only VMware adapter SCCM can work with.

Now we do another step to get the properties from the newly created adapter so we can use the information to input the computer into SCCM.

 

Getting the production network adapter settings from the virtual machine

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Now that we collected the necessary information for SCCM, we can import the computer into SCCM.

This is done by a powershell script that needs to input parameters, the name and the MAC address.

 

Adding the computer to SCCM

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Now that the computer is known is SCCM, we need to add it to the collection that has the OSD advertised to it.

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The is done by the following step.

 

Adding the computer to an SCCM collection

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In the collection field, you can enter 2 things, either the name of the collection or the ID of the collection. What you enter must match the collection value type. If you enter an ID as shown here, the value type must be ID as well. The same is true for the computer where we use the name from the Custom Start step so the value type is name in this case.

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Now that the VM is created and provisioned in SCCM, we are ready to deploy the operating system on it.

So let’s power on the VM.

 

Powering on the virtual machine

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The only thing you need to power on a VM is the name and we still get the from the first step.

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Now that the VM is booting up, SCCM can start the task sequence to deploy an operating system on the VM.

Meanwhile, we will check the progress in Opalis.

 

Getting the virtual machine deployment status

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The advertisement ID is the ID as it is known in SCCM and the computer name is still the name as we specified in the first step.

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Looping the task

Now since the OSD deployment takes some time to complete, we will let the step loop until it gets a result back from SCCM.

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It will recheck every 300 second and will do this 8 times or when it gets back from SCCM that the deployment was successful in order not keep the loop while the deployment was finished faster then in 8 loops.

 

Getting the deployment result

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Now we need to output the result to any medium you want (logfile, mail, …), I do an output to a text file as an example.

Conditional progress

Now how does Opalis know when to write to which log file?

This can be regulated by double clicking on the arrows. This is the arrow toward the success file.

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As you can see, it will only follow this arrow when SCCM outputs a succeeded message for the advertisement. If not, it will take the other path towards the failed log file.

 

So , It is not so easy to get it all together , but if I may give a great tip: ” Write down all steps of your manual flow  and then try to translate them into an opalis workflow “

 

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

Configmgr 2007 and how to automate Windows 7 Backup Activation thru a task sequence

11:43 am in ConfigMgr, ConfigMgr 2007, ConfigMgr 2007 R2, ConfigMgr SP2, ConfigMgr2007 R3, Deployment, Installation, Operating System Deployment, OSD, sccm, SCCM 2007, SCCM 2007 R2, SCCM 2007 R3, SCCM 2007 SP2, sccm2007, Task Sequence, Windows 7, Windows 7 SP1 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

One of my customers is using a GHOST principle on their laptops, to restore an original image from a restore partition. This partition is right now visible for the end user. Now that we are migrating towards SCCM we want to do the same thing thru Configmgr.

To accomplish this, we only focus on the integrated windows 7 backup tools as they have a native build in wizard to restore as well .

Scenario to accomplish :

  1. We want to do a full backup at the end of the deployment task sequence , including the standard applications and save it locally. This one allows you to restore the machine as it was at the end of the task sequence.
  2. We want to let any user restore that image on an easy way with helpdesk support . Mainly this scenario is for end users that are sitting somewhere in the “bush bush” and no direct connection to a nearby office .
  3. We want to schedule for those kind of users a backup when he is working on his machine , based on VSS technology . ( impossible with ghost ).

Steps to accomplish the scenario :

First of all I want to thank Kim Oppalfens and George Simons ( both MVP ConfigMgr ) for helping me accomplish this scenario. We had some offline discussions to accomplish this scenario and it is not yet perfect .

The initial process we have in mind during the Operating system deployment phase when we stage an image to a machine for a user:

1. Creating the necessary partitions :

  • System partition (+/- 500 mb) that will hold the bootloader (think of Bitlocker ) and the WINRE environment. ( hidden )
  • C:\ OS partition
  • D:\ Data partition
  • E:\ IMAGE system image backup partition (drive letter will be removed in the process)

2. Create local admin user f.e. RECOVERY and added the local admins group. We have tested this with a power user or backup operator , however you need local admin rights to restore the image. For security purposes we investigate later to have a daily/weekly/monthly password changer based upon an algorithm.

3. Run the windows 7 built-in WBADMIN tool, with the following parameters : “wbadmin START BACKUP –BackupTarget:E: -include:c: -AllCritical –Quiet”

4. Remove drive letter of the “Image”Partition , in this case E:\ 

 

We don’t care about hiding the volume. Standard users have no permissions to reassign a drive letter, and hence won’t be able to see or use the partition. That is more than enough for us. Hiding the partition just complicates matters for us from an admin perspective.

The additional process we could have in mind is to send down a task sequence to back up his system when a user requests it. This could be performed with or without  any user interaction.

Task Sequence example :

</group>
      <group name="Backup" description="">
        <step type="SMS_TaskSequence_RunCommandLineAction" name="Create Admin Recovery User" description="" timeout="900" runIn="WinPEandFullOS" successCodeList="0 3010">
          <action>smsswd.exe /run: net user recovery Helpdesk123 /add</action>
          <defaultVarList>
            <variable name="CommandLine" property="CommandLine" hidden="true">net user recovery Helpdesk123 /add</variable>
            <variable name="SMSTSDisableWow64Redirection" property="DisableWow64Redirection">false</variable>
            <variable name="_SMSTSRunCommandLineAsUser" property="RunAsUser">false</variable>
            <variable name="SuccessCodes" property="SuccessCodes" hidden="true">0 3010</variable>
          </defaultVarList>
        </step>
        <step type="SMS_TaskSequence_RunCommandLineAction" name="Add Recovery User to Local Admin" description="" timeout="900" runIn="WinPEandFullOS" successCodeList="0 3010">
          <action>smsswd.exe /run: net localgroup "Administrators" recovery /add</action>
          <defaultVarList>
            <variable name="CommandLine" property="CommandLine" hidden="true">net localgroup "Administrators" recovery /add</variable>
            <variable name="SMSTSDisableWow64Redirection" property="DisableWow64Redirection">false</variable>
            <variable name="_SMSTSRunCommandLineAsUser" property="RunAsUser">false</variable>
            <variable name="SuccessCodes" property="SuccessCodes" hidden="true">0 3010</variable>
          </defaultVarList>
        </step>
        <step type="SMS_TaskSequence_RunCommandLineAction" name="Create Backup" description="" timeout="1200" runIn="WinPEandFullOS" successCodeList="0 3010">
          <action>smsswd.exe /run: wbadmin START BACKUP -BackupTarget:e: -include:c: -AllCritical -Quiet</action>
          <defaultVarList>
            <variable name="CommandLine" property="CommandLine" hidden="true">wbadmin START BACKUP -BackupTarget:e: -include:c: -AllCritical -Quiet</variable>
            <variable name="SMSTSDisableWow64Redirection" property="DisableWow64Redirection">false</variable>
            <variable name="_SMSTSRunCommandLineAsUser" property="RunAsUser">false</variable>
            <variable name="SuccessCodes" property="SuccessCodes" hidden="true">0 3010</variable>
          </defaultVarList>
        </step>
        <step type="SMS_TaskSequence_RunCommandLineAction" name="Hide Drive Letter" description="" timeout="900" runIn="WinPEandFullOS" successCodeList="0 3010">
          <action>smsswd.exe /run: Mountvol e: /D</action>
          <defaultVarList>
            <variable name="CommandLine" property="CommandLine" hidden="true">Mountvol e: /D</variable>
            <variable name="SMSTSDisableWow64Redirection" property="DisableWow64Redirection">false</variable>
            <variable name="_SMSTSRunCommandLineAsUser" property="RunAsUser">false</variable>
            <variable name="SuccessCodes" property="SuccessCodes" hidden="true">0 3010</variable>
          </defaultVarList>
        </step>
      </group>

End user experience :

1.When your Windows 7 machine gets broken it will automatically jump to the window shown below , otherwise Press F8 during boot :

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2. When you start “Repair your computer” , WinRe will start up .

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3. Once “WinRe”is loaded it will ask for your keyboard layout :

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4. Fill in your credentials

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5. Select “System Image Recovery”

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6. Select the image that you want to restore and wait until the process has been completed .

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Remarks / Improvements to make :

  1. The complete process works only once with a hidden drive letter…….until you do the restore. After the restore the drive letter is back and then a user could mess around and delete stuff. I have tried to remove the driveletter before running wbadmin , but I have no success to use the GUID as my drive is MBR and not GPT. Anyway the basic principle works .
  2. User security : We need a algorithm to change the custom local admin restore user  on a daily/weekly/monthly basis as a default password just isn’t secure enough .
  3. Now I am testing to get a function key on a Lenovo to do his magic ( Press F5 and it launches auto magically the recovery environment ) . More on that in a later blog post .

 

Hope it Helps ,

Kenny Buntinx

Configmgr 2007 : Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (SP1) supportability

9:22 pm in ConfigMgr, ConfigMgr 2007, ConfigMgr 2007 R2, ConfigMgr SP2, ConfigMgr2007 R3, FEP2010, Operating System Deployment, OSD, R3, sccm, SCCM 2007, SCCM 2007 R2, SCCM 2007 R3, SCCM 2007 SP2, sccm2007, Windows 7 SP1 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

Hi Guys ,

 

News is traveling fast about the availability of Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2, as it is already available on TechNet ,  MSDN and MVLS site .

 

However it is NOT certified and therefore NOT SUPPORTED for Configuration Manager 2007 SP2 R2 or R3 yet by the Product Group. If you already use it in production , don’t expect Premier Support to help you .

Certification and support statements will take official 90 days after Release To Web ! However , if it is sooner , I will let you know .

 

Now my personal experiences :

 

In our Lab environment everything works OK along with FEP 2010 client, even in our Acceptance Production environment where 500 clients are sitting , but we aren’t moving unless we have an official support statement !

 

Hope it Helps

 

Kenny Buntinx