You are browsing the archive for 2008 July.

How to replace Windows AIK version 1.0 with Windows AIK version 1.1 when you use System Center Configuration Manager 2007

7:56 pm in ConfigMgr 2007, migration, SCCM 2007 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

Microsoft has launched an new article around this . See my previous posts regarding MDT2008  (http://scug.be/blogs/sccm/archive/2008/05/17/installing-osd-deployment-with-mdt-2008-and-get-an-error-in-sms-provider-log-during-mdt-ts-import-custom-boot-image.aspx)


 See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950782/en-us for the full article


To replace Windows AIK version 1.0 with Windows AIK version 1.1, follow these steps:

1. Uninstall Windows AIK 1.0 by using the Add or Remove Programs feature in Control Panel, and then restart the operating system.
2. Install the latest version of Windows AIK. For example, use the Waikx86.msi installation file.
3. Export the boot images from Windows AIK. To do this, follow these steps:

 a.  Click Start, click Run, type Wbemtest.exe in the Open box, and then click OK.
 b.  Click Connect.
 c.  In the Namespace field, type root\sms\site_site code, and then click Connect.
 d.  Click Execute Method.
 e.  In the Object Path field, type SMS_BootImagePackage, and then click OK.
 f.  In the Method field, select ExportDefaultBootImage, and then click Edit In Parameters.
 g.  Under the Properties field, click to select the Architecture check box, and then click Edit Property.
 h.  Next to the Value field, click to select the Not NULL check box, type x86 or x64 under the Value field, and then click Save Property.
 i.  Under the Properties field, click to select the ExportImagePath check box, and then click Edit Property.
 j.  Next to the Value field, click to select the Not NULL check box, type the path of the image under the Value field, and then click Save Property.
        k.  Under the Properties field, click to select the ImageIndex check box, and then click Edit Property.
 l.  Next to the Value field, click to select the Not NULL check box, type 1 under the Value field, and then click Save Property.
 m.  Click Save Object.
 n.  Click Execute. After some time, a dialog box that indicates success appears.
 
4. In the Configuration Manager console, import the image to System Center Configuration Manager. To do this, follow these steps:
 
 a.  Under System Center Configuration Manager in the Configuration Manager console, expand Computer Management, expand Operating System Deployment, expand Boot Images, and then click Add Boot Image on the Actions pane.
 b.  Supply the location and the name of the new boot image that you specified in step 3j for the ExportImagePath value, and then follow the instructions in the wizard to add the boot image.
 
5. Verify the version of Windows AIK. To do this, follow these steps:
 
 a.  Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Microsoft Windows AIK, and then click Windows System Image Manager.
 b.  Click Help, and then click About.The build number for Windows AIK version 1.1 is 6.0.6001.18000.

 

Kenny Buntinx

Importing Drivers in SCCM : Inside view

6:57 pm in ConfigMgr 2007, migration, SCCM 2007 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

Got this one from Brett Flag – OSD team Microsoft  :


SCCM defines a driver as an INF file plus its associated content.  When a driver is first imported we do a check to see if the exact same driver (e.g. same INF file and content) has already been imported at the site and prevent it from being imported.  However, if there are any differences then the metadata is read from the INF file (including name, manufacturer, supported operating systems, etc.) and a new driver object is created.


It is not uncommon for hardware vendors to package different INF files for each operating system they support in the same directory.  When this happens, SCCM will create a driver object for each INF file but it is smart enough to only keep a single copy of the content.  Since the default name of a driver comes from the supported hardware list in the INF file, each of these driver objects will likely get the same default name even though they support different operating systems (to see if this is the case, check out “Applicability” tab on the Driver’s preview pane).


There are a few things you can do about this:



  1. SCCM generates a default name for a driver based on the hardware that it supports – but you can change this in the driver’s properties screen.
  2. Add additional columns to the Drivers view so that you can tell the difference between the drivers:

    • Select the Drivers node in the Admin UI
    • Run the View – Add/Remove columns… action
    • Select additional columns to display (for example “INF File”)

  3. Ignore it – Since SCCM automatically determines driver applicability at deployment time you don’t really need to worry about the specific drivers in the driver catalog.

After importing a driver you can review the driver catalog matching reports (“Driver catalog matching report for a specific computer” and “Driver catalog matching report for a specific collection”) which use hardware inventory information to predict what drivers match devices in your environment to give you a better idea of how the drivers will be used.


 Thanks Brett …


Regards,


 Kenny Buntinx

Update : OSD deployment with XP SP3

6:47 pm in ConfigMgr 2007, SCCM 2007 by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

Today I used my new OSD deployment package in SCCM with XP SP3 and when I wanted to “Prepare my OS” the task sequence always failed with errorcode 0x08000002.I was figuring out what the hell was going on and then I found it . For XP SP3 you will need the updated “Deploy.cab” with sysprep.


There have been changes to sysprep in XP SP3. I have updated my pages to reflect this but the issue deals with the default profile and it no longer being copied when running sysprep. Before SP3 and without the patch the default profile was copied from the administrator account during the sysprep process, this behavior however changed in SP3 or when you installed the hotfix 887816. In SP3 the default setting is to not copy the default profile, thus a new key was added to sysprep.inf to allow for this functionality. The UpdateServerProfileDirectory=1 setting tells SP3 to copy the administrator profile to the default profile during the sysprep process.


 Hope it works out for you ,


 Kenny Buntinx

Deploying a Windows XP SP3 "Gold image" with SCCM 2007

7:23 pm in ConfigMgr 2007, SCCM 2007, script by Kenny Buntinx [MVP]

This post and subsequent posts will be a step by step on how to build a base XP SP3 image in SCCM. I will be outlining not necessarily pointing out every click. Hopefully others will find this helpful. This assumes an understanding of SCCM and uses what is refereed to as a “Thin Image Strategy”.



  1. Create a network access account, it only need be a domain user and its password should not expire. Add the account to the Computer Client Agent in the Client node under Site Settings
  2. Import XP SP3 as an operating system Install Package.
  3. Add a Distribution point to your new XP SP3 package created in step 1
  4. Create the XP SP3 sysprep package in SCCM

    1. The Deploy.cab included on the CD was not updated properly for XP SP3 so you must download a new version here.
    2. Create a package that points at the extracted CAB file for its source
    3. You do not need to create any programs for the package the build task sequence takes care of this
    4. Add the package to a DP that can be used during your build

  5. Create a package for the Config Mgr Client


    1. Specify always obtain file from source directory
    2. Usually here I create a share at \\SCCMSERVER\Souce$\SCCMClient.
    3. Update the ccmsetup command line properties accordingly. Extensive information about command line properties on TechNet here.
    4. Add the package to a DP that can be used during your build

  6. Create a “Build and capture a reference operating system image” task sequence


    1. Name the task sequence something appropriate like “Build & Capture Windows XP SP3 Gold Image”
    2. Select the x86 boot image
    3. Select the Operating System Package you created in step 1
    4. Enter a product key
    5. Set the local admin password to any password
    6. Join a workgroup
    7. Select the Config Mgr client you created in step 4
    8. Don’t add any software to the base image
    9. Set your image properties
    10. Select a location to save the image and make sure you include the full path including the .wim extension
    11. Enter an account with rights to write to the share
    12. Finish up

  7. Change the task sequence to use “Quick Format”

    1. Right Click on the Task Sequence and choose Edit
    2. Select the “Partition Disk 0″ step
    3. Choose properties on the Default (Primary) partition and check the “Quick Format” option

  8. Create a collection to which you will advertise the task sequence; I usually use  “customer” Base Builds
  9. Advertise the task sequence to the collection you created in step 7 as optional

    1. Right click Task sequence and choose advertise, follow the wizard
    2. Make sure you select the check box “Make this task sequence available to boot media and PXE”
    3. If you are in test and your boundaries are not defined make sure you select “When no local distribution points are available, use remote distribution point”
    4. Make sure you completed step 1

  10. Ensure that you have the network and mass storage drivers to boot the device on the boot image and in the driver store (If you have to do this in the future you must update the PXE and standard DPs)
  11. Add the appropriate boot images (x86 / x64) to the PXE and standard DPs
  12. Allow the client to boot from PXE

    1. If this client previously had an SCCM agent on it you just need to add the client to the collection you created in step 6
    2. If this is a new client and SCCM is pre-R2 add the client manually

      1. Add the client by right clicking the Computer Associations node under OSD and choosing “Import Computer Information”
      2. Enter the Name of the computer
      3. Enter the MAC and or SMBIOS GUID
      4. Add the computer to the collection you created in step 7

  13. Boot the device up to PXE and choose your task sequence. In less than an hour you should have the start of a great XP Image

Kenny Buntinx