You are browsing the archive for 2016 January.

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by Florent

[Azure Stack] Installing the TP1

7:00 am in Azure, Azure Stack, Microsoft, TP1 by Florent

On 29 of January 2016, Microsoft has released the first version of Azure Stack, TP1. You can download it here and find the documentation here.

In this article, I will explain to you how to deploy this first preview of Azure Stack.

To start, be sure that you have the following prerequisites, for the hardware:

If your server has note this memory available, you will not be able to pass prerequisites. I advise you to follow this good blog post to bypass this check.

For the architecture, the installer will deploy many VMs, and the final architecture will be the following:

You will have 9 VMs, which are the following:

VM Name Resources Services
ADVM 4 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM AD / DNS / DHCP
ACSVM 4 vCPU / 8192 GB RAM ACS Services
BGPVM 2 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM BGP
MuxVM 2 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM SLB Mux
NCVM 2 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM Network Controller
NATVM 2 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM NAT
xRPVM 8 vCPU / 8192 GB RAM Compute RP / Network RP / Storage RP
SQLVM 4 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM SQL
PortalVM 4 vCPU / 6144 GB RAM Portal Services / ARM
ClientVM 2 vCPU / 4096 GB RAM Client

Be sure to have a Global Admin account in an Azure AD directory and have changed his password:

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On a server that has a minimum of 3 disques of 250GB minimum, download Azure Stack. When the download is finished, create a folder named AzureStack at the root of C:\ and extract downloaded files here. Execute Microsoft Azure Stack POC.exe:

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When it’s done, do a copy of the VHDX WindowsServer2016Datacenter.vhdx and rename it to MicrosoftAzureStackPOCBoot.vhdx:

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Now, mount the VHDX by double clicking on it and execute the following command:

bcdboot <your letter>:\Windows

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Restart the server. The server will restart on the new VHDX. Do the based configuration and give a password:

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When the host is restarted, give it an IP address that can access to Internet, it’s very important to deploy Azure Stack:

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It’s now time to start the installation of Azure Stack. To do this, open a PowerShell window and move to the folder that contains the script DeployAzureStack.ps1. Here, execute the following command:

.\DeployAzureStack.ps1 -NATVMStaticIP 172.X.X.X/24 -NATVMStaticGateway 172.X.X.1 –Verbose

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Here, I use 2 parameters named –NATVMStaticIP and –NATVMStaticGateway because I don’t have a DHCP server in my LAB. It’s very important that this network has an Internet access. The deployment starts, with the domain name azurestack.local. Some questions will be asked to you, that the admin password (1), the Azure AD account that you create previously (2), which Azure Directory you want to use (3) and if you want to install Azure Stack (which question Sourire (4)). The installation is in progress:

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This deployment will take  approximatively 2 hours. When the installation is finished, you will have the following message:

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Nouw, to connect to the administration interface of Azure Stack, go on the desktop of your server.Normally, you have a shortcut on the desktop to connect to the client VM. Connect to it:

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Connect to the portal with using the shortcut located on the desktop, Microsoft Azure Stack POC Portal.url with the Global Admin of your Azure AD:

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You have now access to the admin portal of Azure Stack:

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In the next article, I will show you how to create a plan, an offer, etc. Sourire

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by Florent

[Azure Automation] Error Validating Credentials

7:00 am in Azure, Azure Active Directory, Azure Automation, Microsoft by Florent

Today, one of my client had the following error in Azure Automation:

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After reflecting about where could be the problem, I thought that in Azure AD, passwords must have a expiration date. I found this link: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/jj943764.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

In fact, the password expire after 90 days by default and I didn’t received an email because my account didn’t have an email address set.

I logged in with this user to Azure Active Directory in PowerShell with the following commands (I updated my password because the old password wasn’t working anymore):

$credentials = Get-Credential automation@domain.onmicrosoft.com
Connect-MsolService -Credential $credentials

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Execute the following command to have the password policy:

Get-MsolPasswordPolicy –DomainName domain.onmicrosoft.com

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If you have the above error, check if the acocunt is Global Admin in your Azure AD:

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You can now update the settings for the Password Validity and the Notifications in your Azure AD, with the following command:

Set-MsolPasswordPolicy –DomainName domain.onmicrosoft.com –ValidityPeriod 180 –NotificationDays 30

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Replace with your own values. My new values are:

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SIf you want to set the password to Never Expire, you can do it with the following command:

Set-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName automation@domain.onmicrosoft.com -PasswordNeverExpires $True

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The result can be displayed with the following command:

Get-MsolUser | Where {$_.PasswordNeverExpires -eq $True}

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I hope that this quick explanation will help you Sourire

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by Florent

[SCOM 2012 R2] Install and configure the Azure Management Pack

7:00 am in Azure, Microsoft, SCOM by Florent

In October, Microsoft has released a Management Pack (in Technical Preview) to monitor your Azure subscription (ARM too). You can download it here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=50013

The list of what you can monitor is in the documentation.

To start, import your Management Pack in SCOM:

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The import is done:

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Now, go to your Azure AD and create a new account that you will use to monitor your Azure subscription:

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Add this account as Administrator of the subscription:

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Now, go back on SCOM and navigate to Administration > Microsoft Azure. Click on Add Subscription:

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Provide the username/password created previously:

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Choose the subscription that you want to monitor:

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Choose from which pool you want to monitor this infrastructure and add a proxy if you need it to go outside:

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The subscription is now register:

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You can add many subscriptions if you want. Now, go to Authoring > Microsoft Azure Monitoring and create a new one:

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Give a name and choose a Management Pack where overrides will be wrote:

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Choose the subscription and confirm the password for the Azure AD account:

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Select which services you want to monitor:

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If you want to add exception to do not monitor a specific instance (for a test for example), you can add it here:

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Select counters to monitor:

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Your Azure subscription is now monitored:

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After few seconds, you will have the first information about the monitoring of the subscription:

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You can monitor multiple subscriptions, add/remove some counters, etc. It’s a very good management pack to have a quick view on the Azure Environment Sourire

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by Florent

[SC 2012 R2] Size your Private Cloud

7:00 am in COSN, Microsoft, Private Cloud, System Center, WAP by Florent

I just published on TechNet an Excel file that will help you to size and to create your Windows Azure Pack environment, in high availability.

You will be able to find in this document:

  • The number of VMs to deploy
  • Which product you need to install
  • Which service account you need to use
  • Etc.

This environment is like Microsoft COSN certification.

You will be able to download/evaluate my file here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Sizing-of-your-Private-e480d509

If you have remarks/suggestions/comments, don’t hesitate to let me know Sourire